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Marley (Review)

Reggae legend is straightforwardly rendered in this fascinating documentary

0 Comments · Thursday, May 3, 2012
Why does Bob Marley — the man and his music — still resonant more than 30 years after his death? That’s a question director Kevin MacDonald tries to unpack in this straightforwardly rendered, often fascinating documentary about the Reggae legend.   

Damsels in Distress (Review)

Whit Stillman’s much-anticipated film arrives with the writer/director’s singular voice intact

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 2, 2012
Whit Stillman creates a place that seems hermetically sealed off from the rest of the world — cinematographer Doug Emmett notably bathes the proceedings in unnaturally bright light — a place that posits the major problem in contemporary social life as “the tendency to always seek someone cooler than yourself” without a whiff of irony.  

The Avengers: Some Assembly Required

0 Comments · Tuesday, May 1, 2012
Back in 1963, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby probably didn’t have as much trouble creating Earth’s Mightiest Heroes as Hollywood has had in bringing these super duper dudes (and one dark and mysterious dudette) to the screen.    

Alternative Tentpoles: a Preview of Indie Summer 2012

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 25, 2012
The beginning of May has heralded the dawn of summer at the box office for nearly a decade, which means that by now, thanks to the rise of the movie trailers, we are all overly familiar with the blockbusters of the season. Marvel’s The Avengers kicks things off for the superheroes, with The Amazing Spider-Man and The Dark Knight Rises to come.  

'Bully' Shines a Cold, Harsh Light on Social Blindness

5 Comments · Tuesday, April 17, 2012
To say that we need to address the topic of bullying in our schools, communities and society at large should mean that the Weinstein Company’s efforts to drum up controversy (and publicity) surrounding their battle with the MPAA over the rating of Lee Hirsch’s documentary, Bully, have worked.    

An Unadulterated Kick to the Heart of Action Fans

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 11, 2012
Midnight Madness swept the Toronto International Film Festival last year and the clear winners were the audiences who saw The Raid: Redemption, the martial arts actioner from writer-director Gareth Evans. The Raid introduces Rama, a rookie SWAT team officer prepping for his first full-scale assignment, an early morning raid on an apartment building that serves as the stronghold for a ruthless drug lord.  

The Arts as Hero

A research project gives rise to a film about Cincinnati’s thriving arts scene

2 Comments · Tuesday, April 3, 2012
“I’ve seen the future,” Prince sang back in 1989 on the soundtrack to Tim Burton’s Batman, “and it will be …” Gotham City was on the cusp of change; a hero had arrived on the scene to usher in the new. Cincinnati has been waiting, always on the verge of its own bankable opportunity to step into the future as a lively and engaged urban market. Every city needs a hero.   

The Bittersweet End of a Swell Season of Love

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 3, 2012
Once upon a time, audiences fell in love with Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová as their characters in the hit movie Once fell slowly into an unrequited affair rooted in their shared musical passion. They stepped off the screen together, formed a group (The Swell Season) and took their love affair on the road.  

Lynne Ramsay Returns With Haunting Tale of Family Discord

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 28, 2012
Scottish filmmaker Lynne Ramsay has a thing for misery. Her memorable 1999 feature-length debut, Ratcatcher, is set amid a Glasgow tenement block in 1973 and follows a 12-year-old boy who, after his friend’s accidental drowning, increasingly retreats into his own solitary world, a place where he befriends an abused girl and spends time in a half-built housing project adjacent to a sprawling wheat field.   

Healing the Universal Family

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 21, 2012
In a small Tennessee town, Cody Hines (Trevor St. John) — a happily married husband and teacher with a baby on the way — loses his wife shortly after the birth of their son. He finds solace and support in the arms of Joey Williams (Patrick Wang) and endeavors to raise his son Chip (Sebastian Banes) in this newly reconfigured family.  

Best Foreign Language Nominee Takes Shelter In the Depths

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 13, 2012
Stories about the Holocaust lead to questions at the heart of our humanity. Beyond what it means to be human — Dr. Cornel West’s assertion that the human urge is to engage in the fierce struggle to live with the inevitability of death — what is it that we, in any given moment or situation, would be willing to do to survive or to protect the life of another?  

Talking About Friends, Kids and Production

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 7, 2012
Julie and Jason take notes as the arrival of children seems to rip the romance out of the relationships of their coupled friends, the ever-horny Ben and Missy and the humorously rock-solid Leslie and Alex. The six are lively and cultured New Yorkers enjoying their version of Sex and the City, but all of them are vaguely aware, in theory, that kids will challenge their ability to dine out in style and vacation with ease.
  

Iranian Film Shows Family as a Necessary Fabric

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 28, 2012
A Separation presents Simin (Leila Hatami) and Nader (Peyman Maadi), a couple caught in a legal battle. Simin wants a divorce, so she can take their daughter and flee the social oppression of Iran, with its restrictions on women, education and civil liberty.  

Gus Van Sant Continues Down His Own Unique Path

2 Comments · Tuesday, February 21, 2012
Few contemporary filmmakers can claim a career as interesting as Gus Van Sant’s. The 59-year-old director studied painting at the Rhode Island School of Design before shifting his studies to film. He tried his hand at Hollywood after graduation, but soon moved his home base to Portland, Ore., a place where his artier leanings would flourish.   

Wim Wenders’ Pina Projects ‘Dance Theater’ in 3D

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 14, 2012
The idea of “dance theater” (“Tanztheater” in German) evolved from expressionist dance in 1920s Vienna, with a new form developing and spreading throughout Central Europe beginning in 1917. The term re-emerged during the 1980s and Pina Bausch, a student of one of the leaders of this school of dance, became a new school practioner of note.