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He Named Me...

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 7, 2015
Director Davis Guggenheim explores the burden of names in He Named Me Malala, his latest documentary foray showcasing the astonishing story of Malala Yousafzai.   

‘Sicario’ Brings Us Face-to-Face with the Void

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 30, 2015
Kate Macer (Emily Blunt) is in over her head. A tactical FBI agent with a solid record, the willingness to take the kill-shot without hesitation and no life outside work to speak of, Macer is the perfect audience stand-in in Sicario, the latest journey into the heart of darkness masterminded by Canadian director Denis Villeneuve.

‘Stonewall’ Hides Behind Dramatic Stereotypes

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 23, 2015
Roland Emmerich, over the course of his illustrious filmmaking career, has attempted to write disaster fantasy on the largest canvas possible.  

Toronto International Film Festival: A Soundtrack

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 16, 2015
The 40th year of the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), the festival of festivals, will forever be linked in my memories to music. I ended up with a unique sampler of features and documentaries focusing on the lives of challenging and tragic musical figures.

The Anticipated End of the Labor Day Movie Blues

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 9, 2015
Not so long ago, the fallow period in the film-release schedule used to be in the early part of the year.  

From ‘Mistress America’ to Majority Rule

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 2, 2015
Snagging an interview with a rising star, a sure-to-be It-Girl player like Lola Kirke, is definitely a catch-as-catch-can proposition.   

Crack Open ‘The Diary of a Teenage Girl’ at Your Own Risk

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 26, 2015
I live in a house with a pair of teenage girls, so the idea of having access to their diaries or their unfiltered thoughts frightens me to no end, especially after watching The Diary of a Teenage Girl.  

Staving Off ‘The End’ with Donald Margulies

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 19, 2015
The End of the Tour documents an encounter between David Foster Wallace and Rolling Stone writer David Lipsky, who tagged along for the end of the press tour for Wallace’s Infinite Jest. Lipsky’s book, Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself, chronicles the five days he spent with Wallace and serves as the basis for the film.  

Guy Ritchie: The Director and ‘The Man’ S.H.R.U.G.S.

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 12, 2015
In more than 15 years of covering the film beat, never have I encountered a more out-of-left-field production than Guy Ritchie’s reboot of The Man from U.N.C.L.E., which was based on the telev  

‘Irrational Man’ Argues Against Rationalizing a Career

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 5, 2015
I think it might be time to start evaluating the career of Woody Allen by comparing it to the musical output of LL Cool J (aka James Todd Smith).  

Movies of My Mind

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 29, 2015
I simply can’t find the words (or the feelings behind the words) to describe the soulless hell that is this week’s reboot of Vacation. So instead, I’m daydreaming — thinking of movies that will never be.  

‘Infinitely Polar Bear’: Insight Beyond a Cute Title

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 22, 2015
The viewing experience sometimes needs to be shared, and I’m talking about films beyond the obvious genre exercises — the found-footage horrors where very little happens, seemingly made for midnight screenings, or the mythic displays of cartoonish world-beating violence that dominate the shared mythic realms of our comic book universes.  

Marvel’s Ant Caper Is Fast and Fun

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 15, 2015
Sometimes it pays off big to make a few small, albeit risky departures from convention. 

Wandering Aimlessly Inside Blumhouse’s ‘Gallows’

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 8, 2015
Since filmmaking collaborators Travis Cluff and Chris Lofing teamed up back in 2011 on Kid HULK — a four-minute short about a young Bruce Banner who helps a girl deal with bullies — it might be logical to assume that the pair might have been interested in attracting the attention of the Marvel-movie-universe brain trust in the hope of securing a coveted gig helming one of the highly anticipated superhero features on the horizon.  

Thomas Mann: From ‘Project X’ to ‘The Dying Girl’

Review: Me and Earl and the Dying Girl

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 1, 2015
Weaned on ludicrous white-male teen fantasies like Risky Business and Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (the whole John Hughes oeuvre, really), even as an adult I have to admit to a partiality toward movies in which the teen heroes live in a world gloriously beyond the attention of parents who bear more than a passing resemblance to police and other authority figures.