WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
Home · Articles · Arts & Culture · Onstage
Onstage
 

Wagner Blues

Despite cancellations by key players, Cincy Opera's 90th season debut is on track

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 5, 2010
April has been the cruelest month as far as Cincinnati Opera is concerned. Within a two-week span, the highly anticipated production of Richard Wagner's 'Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg' lost three of its star performers, mostly for health reasons, and Artistic Director Evans Mirageas was stuck in London when volcanic ash grounded his flights. But pinch hitters are stepping up.  

Angelic Doubleheader

Know Theatre offers a daylong immersion in 'Angels in America'

0 Comments · Monday, May 3, 2010
Considering Know Theatre of Cincinnati's 10-year track record of bold moves and departures, their doubleheader staging of Tony Kushner's 'Angels in America: Millennium Approaches' and 'Angels in America: Perestroika' should come as no surprise. Nor should it come as any surprise that Know would offer theater addicts — yes, I confess to being among them — several opportunities to immerse in the entire six-plus hours of both 'Angels' on a single day.  

Cirque du Soleil: Alegria (Review)

Touring Cirque show is an acrobatic dreamscape

1 Comment · Friday, April 30, 2010
The 16-year-old touring show presently performing at NKU's Bank of Kentucky Center is polished and professional yet presented with affecting naiveté. It captures the essence of why Cirque du Soleil has become a worldwide brand, offering an opportunity to enter an alternate universe, a place skillfully and imaginatively conceived that resembles a dream more than waking reality.  

Angels in America: Perestroika (Review)

Know Theatre completes its 'Angels' repertory with a powerful Part II

0 Comments · Sunday, April 25, 2010
Know Theatre of Cincinnati's staging of Tony Kushner's monumental '90s icon 'Angels in America' continues with 'Part II: Perestroika.' Let me simply say that if you miss this show you'll kick yourself. It's a showcase of excellent Cincinnati actors doing one of the most important plays of the past 25 years.   

Picnic (Review)

CCM students shine in reprise of '50s social drama

0 Comments · Saturday, April 24, 2010
I love seeing new works onstage, but sometimes it's great to be reminded that every era had its fine playwrights and their work should be seen more often. William Inge is such a writer, and his best work was probably 'Picnic,' a show that earned a Pulitzer Prize and became a memorable 1955 film starring William Holden and Kim Novak. The play is being very credibly staged by UC's College-Conservatory of Music in a brief run April 21-25.  

The Marvelous Wonderettes (Review)

ETC's nostalgic, campy musical is genuine in its love for '50s/'60s pop music

0 Comments · Friday, April 23, 2010
Lynn Meyers' intuition for audience-pleasing productions continues its unerring course at Ensemble Theatre with this musical about four young women who have dreams and hopes and keep striving for them. The Wonderettes of Act I are a high-school girl group who get to sing at their 1958 prom when a boy group gets into some teenage trouble; in Act II, a decade later, they're back for a reunion.  

An Ideal Husband (Review)

Cincy Shakespeare's Wilde production is about something worth discussing

0 Comments · Monday, April 19, 2010
Putting it as simply as I can, Oscar Wilde's 'An Ideal Husband' is the crowning pleasure of Cincinnati Shakespeare Company's 2009-10 season. Everything works. The direction by Jeremy Dubin is tight, focused and spot on. Design elements are more sumptuous and elegant than any CSC has ever presented. Performances maintain the lilt, audacity and inner laughter of high comedy.   

Bye Bye Birdie (Review)

NKU revival offers a surprisingly serious take on growing up

0 Comments · Monday, April 19, 2010
Northern Kentucky University's production of the musical 'Bye Bye Birdie' is a surprisingly serious take on growing up and finding true love in various means. That's not to say that this is a downer of a play — it elicits laughs from the get-go and leaves the audience chuckling along to the message that everyone still has "a lot of livin' yet to do."  

Craig Ferguson's Wee Small Hour

Comedian continues to carve out a cozy niche in late night talk

0 Comments · Monday, April 19, 2010
"It's a great day in America," bellows Craig Ferguson every weeknight five minutes after David Letterman's show fades out. The talk-show host, hyper-Scotsman, stand-up comedian and naturalized American citizen has been credited by many media commentators as being more innovative and substantial than his late-night counterparts, and the ratings have been catching up.   

25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Review)

The word from Showbiz Players is 'entertaining'

2 Comments · Sunday, April 18, 2010
One of the first productions of this Broadway musical hit licensed to an amateur theater is happening right here in Cincinnati. Showbiz Players, a community theater with a history spanning three decades, presents it at the Madisonville Arts Center through April 25, and this production works hard to recreate the original.  

Cyrano Rehearsed (Review)

Despite the poetry, New Edgecliff production wastes serious potential

0 Comments · Friday, April 16, 2010
Over several seasons, outgoing Artistic Director Greg Procaccino has elevated New Edgecliff Theater's reputation with sensitive, provocative productions like 'Glengarry Glen Ross' and 'Equus.' Now, in a curious farewell gesture, he's wasting audience enthusiasm and some estimable players in a misconceived muddle called 'Cyrano (Rehearsed).'  

Mary Poppins (Review)

Touring show is simply too much of a good thing

0 Comments · Monday, April 12, 2010
Everyone who sees this stage production will enjoy it, although the show strikes me as more overstuffed than Mary's magical carpetbag. After almost three hours, many of the children in the audience were asleep or whining to go home. That's not to say the show lacks entertaining moments. In truth, there are simply too many.  

Bury the Dead (Review)

Anti-war drama at The Carnegie a little too pompous

0 Comments · Monday, April 12, 2010
Since Irwin Shaw's expressionistic, ritualistic play opened on Broadway in 1936, five more major wars have come along to prove its horrific accusation: Old generals march young men off to their slaughter while spouting jingoistic exhortations that civilians accept and industrialists turn into profit. Shaw's work is back, with accusations intact and ritual inflated, in a co-production between The Carnegie Center in Covington and UC's College-Conservatory of Music.  

The History of Invulnerability (Review)

Powerful Playhouse world premiere should be required viewing

1 Comment · Sunday, April 11, 2010
David Bar Katz's story about Superman and his comic book creator might sound like an amusing, nostalgic show. The Shelterhouse Theatre is papered with comic book panels, and the lights come up on Superman (handsome Steve Wilson) with a confident "I'm in charge" look as he begins to describe his genealogy. The true subject, however, is vulnerability rather than invulnerability.  

Angels in America: Millennium Approaches (Review)

Know Theatre's 'Angels' debut is powerfully staged and acted

0 Comments · Monday, April 5, 2010
I submit as Exhibit A for the strength of Cincinnati theater the current production at Know Theatre, Part I of 'Angels in America,' 'Millennium Approaches.' This powerful script deserves and demands strong acting, and some of the city's best performers have risen to the challenge, guest directed by Cincinnati Shakespeare's Brian Isaac Phillips.