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George M! (Review)

Red, white and true blue

0 Comments · Thursday, July 19, 2012
George M. Cohan could easily have been mistaken for a whole crowd of people: The American entertainer was known as a playwright, composer, lyricist, actor, singer, dancer and producer. He is the individual who most shaped the art form of American musical comedy. In 1968, the musical George M! took Cohan’s life and made it into a show — a logical step for a man who spent most of his own career writing and performing in his own productions.  

The Foreigner (Review)

Still fresh after 30 years

0 Comments · Sunday, July 8, 2012
I’ve seen Ken Shue’s 1984 comedy The Foreigner in several good productions. It’s one of the funniest plays I know, a well-oiled laugh machine, but if you anticipate what’s happening, you’d think it would diminish the humor.   

Porgy and Bess (Preview)

Cincinnati Opera channels 1930s Charleston in American Classic

0 Comments · Thursday, June 28, 2012
George Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess ranks as America’s most famous opera. Its arias and ensembles are firmly ensconced in the American Popular Songbook: “Summertime,” “I Got Plenty o Nuttin’,” “Bess, You Is My Woman Now,” “I Loves You, Porgy.” “It Ain’t Necessarily So.” No other opera comes close except Carmen, and that’s French.  

Love Conquers All

Cincinnati Opera channels 1930s Charleston in American Classic

0 Comments · Tuesday, June 26, 2012
George Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess ranks as America’s most famous opera. Its arias and ensembles are firmly ensconced in the American Popular Songbook: “Summertime,” “I Got Plenty o Nuttin’,” “Bess, You Is My Woman Now,” “I Loves You, Porgy.” “It Ain’t Necessarily So.” No other opera comes close except Carmen, and that’s French.  

Next to Normal (Review)

ETC's revival of 2011 favorite even more powerful

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 20, 2012
When Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati (ETC) produced the Pulitzer Prize-winning musical next to normal last September, it was an early highlight of the 2011-2012 theater season. Although it’s hard to imagine, ETC’s two-week revival of the show about Diana’s battle with schizophrenia and how that illness affects her family, is even more powerful now than it was nine months ago.  

Tweet Victory

Rob Delaney builds his comedy following 140 characters at a time

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 13, 2012
Many popular comedians are recognized from TV performances, movie work or perhaps a radio program like The Bob & Tom Show. Or maybe they have a popular podcast like Marc Maron or Jimmy Pardo. Rob Delaney has become one of today’s hottest comedians without any of that. Most comedy fans know Delaney strictly from Twitter. (Follow him at @robdelaney, if you don’t already.)   

Ninth Annual Cincy Fringe Sets Records

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 13, 2012
The most successful Cincinnati Fringe Festival since the annual event’s launch in 2004 wrapped up on June 9, boasting a nearly 9 percent increase in overall attendance compared to 2011, from 7,177 to 7,728. More than 230 artists performed, and the number of sold-out performances, 24, set a new record.
  

Ninth Annual Cincy Fringe Sets Records

Freaky fixture in local arts scene brings creativity, community

2 Comments · Monday, June 11, 2012
The most successful Cincinnati Fringe Festival since the annual event’s launch in 2004 wrapped up on June 9, boasting a nearly 9 percent increase in overall attendance compared to 2011, from 7,177 to 7,728. More than 230 artists performed, and the number of sold-out performances, 24, set a new record.  

Silent Bob Speaks Up

Kevin Smith talks podcast, ‘getting old’

0 Comments · Tuesday, May 15, 2012
“We didn’t dream where we were from,” says Kevin Smith of his childhood in Highlands, N.J. “Nobody had an example to point to and say ‘Hey, someone came from Highland and did something big.’ And no one from my family had done anything like that.”  

Titanic (Review)

3 Comments · Monday, May 14, 2012
 The opening 15 minutes of Titanic: The Musical, recreating the tragic 1912 sinking of the doomed ocean liner, is one of the most stirring, evocative sequences in all of musical theater. It grabs you as you meet dozens of characters boarding the ship, overflowing with great expectations — of success, of escaping poverty, of new life in America, of achieving dreams. But we know what awaits many of them in the freezing North Atlantic after the collision with an iceberg.   

The Merchant of Venice (Review)

Comedy, tragedy staged in complex Shakespearean production

0 Comments · Monday, May 14, 2012
 Let’s give props to Cincinnati Shakespeare Company for bringing to the stage The Merchant of Venice, one of Shakespeare’s most difficult plays. It’s officially categorized as a comedy, and it contains humorous and romantic elements, including a subplot about contesting for the hand of a wealthy heiress. But the central story of a more dire contest between a moneylender and a businessman is anything but amusing.
  

One Hell of a Collaboration

0 Comments · Thursday, May 10, 2012
The Rake’s Progress promises to be the first of what CCM staff hope will be regular interactive performances. Visual media is here to stay, says College-Conservatory of Music director Robin Guarino, and a tech-savvy public expects it in their theater experiences.   

Elie Wiesel Addresses Lessons of the Holocaust

0 Comments · Tuesday, May 1, 2012
Elie Wiesel, the Nobel Peace Prize winner and human-rights advocate whose landmark 1956 memoir of surviving the Holocaust, Night, has been translated into more than 30 languages, will speak Sunday evening at Xavier University’s Cintas Center. For his sponsoring agency, his speech will be more than just a history lesson.    

Thunder Knocking on the Door (Review)

Jocular script staged with musicality, theatricality

0 Comments · Friday, April 27, 2012
First staged in 1999, Thunder is the Mt. Adams theater’s best selling musical during producing artistic director Ed Stern’s tenure. It’s the final mainstage production of his 20th and final season. The show tells a mythical tale of dueling Blues guitarists; it’s stuffed with emotionally conceived songs by renowned singer and composer Keb’ Mo’ working with Anderson Edwards.  

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Review)

Covedale presents Webber's tuneful Bible tale

0 Comments · Thursday, April 26, 2012
 Before Jesus Christ Superstar and The Phantom of the Opera, Andrew Lloyd Webber composed together a brief “pop cantata” based on the biblical story of Joseph and his “coat of many colors.” It was a piece to be sung by children and subsequently recorded as a concept album. Webber later expanded Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, molding it into a bouncy, bubbly show stuffed with musical parodies.