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The Great Escape

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 20, 2012
For Night and Day, a two-person show by Brooklyn-based artists Mike Perry and Naomi Reis currently on view at the gallery/shop/studio YES, I’ve let my guard down a little. The temptation to experience something approaching the sublime beneath the surface of lighthearted illustrations wrapped in psychedelic colors or brittle, architectural depictions of a modernist sphere was just too strong.  

Public (Art) Inquiry

Local organizations to put impressive public art on view this summer

0 Comments · Thursday, June 14, 2012
As the mercury begins its steady ascent and the humid days give way to sultry nights, the climate-controlled environs of Cincinnati’s art galleries beckon. But with the spring season nearing its end and several galleries paring back their programming, despite best efforts to beat the heat, this summer’s hottest works are going to be found outside.
  

Window Into Her World

Sheida Soleimani’s tableau of memories now at Prairie Gallery

1 Comment · Wednesday, June 6, 2012
I find a lost fledgling in my backyard. He blunders about on big feet and his bleating mouth asks to be fed or put back in the nest. I do not speak bird, but I know who does. I call Sheida Soleimani, artist, violinist with the band Marmalade Brigade and Cincinnati’s unofficial avian intermediary.  

The Way We Were: Cincinnati’s Historic Art

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 6, 2012
When the Cincinnati History Museum delves into its attic, or “storage,” as museums are more likely to call their collection of out-of-sight possessions, it has at hand treasures from some of the best attics in the city, among other sources.   

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the BombShells

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 6, 2012
I always admired the BombShells, Cincinnati’s yarn-bombing ladies.  I just didn’t think that, given my lack of crafting skills, I could become one. Now, living the dream of wannabes worldwide, I’ve been invited to participate in a bombing.   

'Color' Outside the Lines at The Carnegie

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 30, 2012
It’d be tempting to turn a show titled Full of Color into a gimmick. Just present a lot of bright, happy paintings and watch the crowds come.  

School's In For Summer

New Art Adademy President John Sullivan steps in

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 30, 2012
Does an art academy founded in the 19th century have a place in today’s world? John Sullivan, new president of the Art Academy of Cincinnati, believes it does.    

Letting Sleeping Giants Lie: Jannis Varelas

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 23, 2012
Jannis Varelas’ exhibition at the Contemporary Arts Center, Sleep, My Little Sheep Sleep, is a multi-media installation of exaggerated figures collaged together from banal materials, the first in a series of projects organized by guest curators from around the world.  

If These Walls Could Talk

Bar/restaurant mural captured the ’80s — bad styles and good times

0 Comments · Tuesday, May 22, 2012
Before Burger Madness, there was mural madness at Arthur’s, the Hyde Park restaurant/bar. From 1981 to 1992, Jerry Dowling painted caricatures of 142 regulars on a 44-foot wall. The characters are still there — on the mural, anyway — but the character has changed.  

Technically Refined, Formally Graceless ‘Compositions’

0 Comments · Tuesday, May 15, 2012
The 20th century looms large in Paul Schuette’s new show Compositions at semantics. An investigation into form, structure and sound, the exhibition’s multimedia works orient themselves around Modernism’s concern with quintessence, but pose typically Postmodern questions about how we define genres and the context in which we encounter works of art.    

Opposites Attract

Thunder-Sky show plays some heady mind games

0 Comments · Tuesday, May 8, 2012
I’m obsessed with the title of Thunder-Sky Inc.’s latest show, Reverse Psychology. The name, a play on two artists’ opposite aesthetics and themes, doesn’t work for me — or does it? Should I be celebrating differences, or searching for similarities? I don’t know what to think, and I think that’s the intent.    

Digging On Pigs

ArtWorks’ second Big Pig Gig public art project takes flight

0 Comments · Tuesday, May 1, 2012
When I was growing up, the fact that Cincinnati was known as “Porkopolis” was not exactly a selling point for me. I vividly remember Bicentennial Commons at Sawyer Point opening in 1988 to much hullabaloo thanks to the flying pig sculptures near the entrance and being absolutely mortified with embarrassment that my hometown would choose to embrace its reputation as a haven for swine.  

'Revolution' in the Head

Clay Street exhibition is a potent cocktail of social commentary and political agitation

1 Comment · Tuesday, April 24, 2012
At over six feet tall, Joseph Winterhalter is an imposing figure. With a deep voice and a firm handshake, he comes across as a fusion between an aging punk rocker and radical intellectual with a lot on his mind.   

Birds, Photos and 'Other Things'

Three coinciding Weston Gallery exhibits take guests on a visual journey

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 17, 2012
If you are an orderly person, your first stop on descending the stairs to see the current installations in the Weston Art Gallery’s lower rooms will be the tiny viewing area just to the right of the staircase. There, Clara Crockett’s “Theatre Lilliputiens,” five brief films with a total running time of 20 minutes, prepare us for the world of her small, meticulous drawings.  

Artists’ Personal Trails Converge at Phyllis Weston

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 17, 2012
You don’t know where some trails will lead. Roads diverge, loop, merge and meander. “I took the one less traveled by,” Robert Frost wrote, “and that has made all the difference.” Phyllis Weston Gallery presents Paper Trail as an opportunity “to explore the brilliant variety of paper as a medium.” But the medium really isn’t the message here.