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Sights of the Season

CAC unveils high-profile shows for its 2009-10 season

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 28, 2009
Shepard Fairey, the hip alternative-culture artist who has become a superstar in the wake of his "Hope, Change and Vote" posters supporting Barack Obama's presidential campaign, leads the Contemporary Art Center's 2009-10 exhibition schedule announced April 28. Fairey will be coming here with the show, doing public art projects in the city and public programs at the CAC. It marks a return of sorts — he was part of the CAC's 'Beautiful Losers: Contemporary Art and Street Culture' exhibition in 2004, a group show that's quickly becoming legendary for its prescience. The new season begins in early October with an ambitious — hopefully groundbreaking — group show curated by the CAC's Maiza Hixson called 'Young Country.'   

Dreams and Trees (Review)

Peter Voshefski escorts viewers into a distillation of nature

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 22, 2009
Peter Voshefski lived in Cincinnati before moving west to earn a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of New Mexico, and he returns to present one of the most intriguing and appealing exhibitions I've seen in Cincinnati lately. Aisle Gallery has been on a long winning streak of great one- and two-person exhibitions, and 'Dreams and Trees' continues it.   

Bold Pact at PAC

New gallery brings contemporary Indian art to Cincinnati

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 15, 2009
Considering the state of the economy, it might seem daring for a new commercial gallery dedicated to contemporary art to open its doors. But the brand new PAC Gallery in East Walnut Hills, set for a grand opening 5-8 p.m. Saturday, is not only opening but is also devoting its first show to contemporary art from India.   

The Places Where People Aren't

Michael Wilson displays 'small things' at the Weston Art Gallery

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 8, 2009
I've seen Michael Wilson's photographs of major musicians like Over the Rhine, Lyle Lovett, Phillip Glass and B.B. King and start asking questions. He's so humble about his work it's almost unnerving. "See, at the Weston Gallery, they’re calling it a mid-career retrospective, which is probably as good a term as any," Wilson says. "For the most part, it will be drawn from 30 years of work that would have been done just for myself. Personal work."  

Tragic Beauty

Anna VanMatre’s paintings convey the complex power of nature

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 1, 2009
“It’s a paradox — the beauty is so tragic,” Anna VanMatre says of the theme behind her latest series of graphite paintings, DeNatural Disaster.  

Mythography (Review)

Telling stories through narrative art

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 25, 2009
Manifest Gallery delights in throwing out an idea and seeing what it might reel in. The current show explores a concept that's as old as art but has been unfashionable in recent years: storytelling.  

The Seventh Time Around

Jeffrey Cortland Jones and Paige Williams team up again

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 18, 2009
There are few exhibition spaces in Cincinnati as dependable and consistent in quality as Aisle Gallery. Its current exhibition, Almost Certain, features two series of abstract paintings by Jeffrey Cortland Jones and Paige Williams. Remarkably, this is the seventh time these two painters have shown together.   

American Grit

Cheryl Dunn documents the irony of life in the U.S.

1 Comment · Wednesday, March 11, 2009
The young blonde girl in the photograph looks perplexed. She's standing in front of a bus called "Willie's Wiener Wagon," which is plastered with signs that read, 'If You Don't Support Victory, You Don't Support Our Troops" and "Proud to be an American." Cheryl Dunn, who took the photograph during the Bush years, doesn't flinch from the gritty, difficult side of life, as suggested by the title of her current show, 'Spit & Peanut Shells: American Pictures,' at Country Club gallery.  

Stewart Goldman: Presence Through Absence (Review)

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 4, 2009
Solid curating and progressive notions have gone into the Cincinnati Art Museum's new solo exhibition in the Vance-Waddell Gallery. The exhibition traces former Art Academy professor Stewart Goldman's evolution from representational painting, of recognizable rooms, into the increasingly less certain terrain of abstract painting.  

A Cincinnati Treasure

Noel Martin, 1922-2009

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 4, 2009
Noel Martin, a lifelong Cincinnati painter and graphic-design pioneer, passed away Feb. 23 at the age of 86. In addition to formal training, Martin taught himself typography and graphics, and in doing so revolutionized museum publishing with his designs for the Cincinnati Art Museum and his modern logo for the Contemporary Arts Center.  

Breaking Convention

David Rosenthal has high hopes for his newly opened Prairie Gallery

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 25, 2009
David Rosenthal, talking in the bare-bones middle room of his new Northside gallery, says, "I'm hoping to provide a place where photography can be done by lots of people and can reach into different areas in lots of different ways."  

The Stuff Nature's Made of

Tara Donovan uses commonplace materials in new ways at the CAC

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 18, 2009
Even from the sidewalk, it's excessively clear that a new, sprawling, elegant exhibition has moved into the Contemporary Arts Center. Kaplan Hall has been hung with a looming nimbus form made from thousands of white Styrofoam cups and backlit with a soft glow. This and two other floors have been turned over to Tara Donovan's immense, organic sculptures.  

Art of Dreams and Desire

Dada and Surrealism take over the Cincinnati Art Museum

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 11, 2009
Like many angst-ridden teenagers in the 1980s, I was a huge fan of Surrealism. Most idolized Salvador Dali, but I loved Rene Magritte and his paintings of massive boulders hovering over the sea, the locomotive that churned forth from a fireplace and the pipe that wasn't a pipe at all. Museum-goers will get the chance to explore the complexities of this art movement when 'Surrealism and Beyond: In the Israel Museum, Jerusalem' at the Cincinnati Art Museum through May 17.   

Four Exhibits (Review)

Commonalities among exhibiting artists at Carl Solway Gallery

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 4, 2009
It seems possible that the four concurrent exhibitions now presented at Carl Solway Gallery are meant to link abstract artists from the past to two contemporary artists who grapple with abstraction, color, humanity and nature. I wish there were more show-stoppers to see, but the four artists provide ample visuals for consideration.   

Outfitting the Past

'Fashion in Film' dresses up the Taft Museum of Art

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 28, 2009
Patrons of the Taft Museum of Art know it to be a rare kind of historical document: An earlier era's furniture, artwork and architecture summon an aura of rigid manors, ladies teas and regency gowns. It's not surprising then that the Taft would aim its curatorial eye on the traveling exhibition, 'Fashion in Film: Period Costumes for the Screen.'