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All for Show

Art museums in Cincinnati, Dayton, Columbus, Toledo and Indianapolis have exciting summer offerings

0 Comments · Tuesday, June 1, 2010
Probably the most eagerly awaited regional art museum event this summer isn’t an indoor exhibition at all. It’s the debut (on June 20) of 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park at Indianapolis Museum of Art. But more locally, the Cincinnati Art Museum and Dayton Art Institute both have great summer shows planned.  

Inner Selves and Animal Instincts

Visual Fringe gets intimate and primal this year

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 26, 2010
"Fringe suggests that (which is) set apart from work aiming at marketability. It probably has a tendency to disturb. Fringe won't answer questions, it will present them." So says Cincinnati artist Robin Stinetorf in his statement for this year's Visual Fringe Festival. He's one of six artists (five humans and a horse) to comprise the visual art appendage of the Cincy Fringe Festival at the Art Academy.  

A Life in Artworks

Carl Solway has rubbed shoulders with some of the world’s most influential artists

2 Comments · Wednesday, May 19, 2010
Right now, the Carl Solway Gallery has a show important to its remarkable history. Works from the Gallery Collection features pieces by more than 60 major artists who, as the 75-year-old Solway puts it, mostly are “people of my generation or close to it.” But what’s most impressive about the show is the close relationship Solway has had with many of the artists including John Cage, Buckminster Fuller and Nam June Paik.  

Peak and Flow (Review)

Fritz Chesnut's abstract paintings ooze West Coast vibes in Country Club exhibit

0 Comments · Tuesday, May 18, 2010
In a first for the galleries, Country Club's Oakley and Los Angeles locations chose to present an exhibition concurrently, painter Fritz Chesnut's 'Peak and Flow,' offering different pieces from the same series. His new abstract paintings radiate a definite West Coast vibe, and they're on view locally through May 29.  

TEMPO (Review)

Manifest Gallery exhibition reflects on time

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 5, 2010
Time has no shape, color or texture. It's non-spatial, constantly changing and invisible. How on earth could an artist hope to capture it? Manifest Gallery explores this elusive medium with the works of 19 artists in 'TEMPO,' curated by Jason Franz, and runs concurrently with 'Rites of Passage' featuring work by college students and recent graduates.  

A Contemporary New Season

CAC's 2010-11 lineup includes exhibits featuring Keith Haring, Shinji Turner-Yamamoto and local artists

1 Comment · Tuesday, April 27, 2010
The Contemporary Arts Center's just-announced 2010-11 season continues its support of emerging artists — including Cincinnati-based ones — in a series of shows mostly curated by Director Raphaela Platow. But it will also feature a tightly focused retrospective of the work of the late Keith Haring as well as a group show with an A-list of contemporary artists, courtesy of a Mexican collection.   

The Art of Rejuvenation

Keep Cincinnati Beautiful's public art program engages and inspires

2 Comments · Tuesday, April 20, 2010
Simplified paintings of windows and doors have been sprouting across the boarded-up facades of derelict buildings around Over-the-Rhine and other inner city spots since last October. They're the work of Future Blooms, an unusual public-art program initiated by Keep Cincinnati Beautiful. In a small, localized way, it recalls the work of the Federal Art Project, part of the job-creation Works Progress Administration that existed as part of the New Deal during the Great Depression.  

Jardin Femme (Review)

Clay Street Press exhibit on the female experience shows potential of computer-crafted art

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 14, 2010
If you still have doubts as to whether computer-generated art can actually be true art, look in on McCrystle Wood's 'Jardin Femme' at Clay Street Press. The 21 computer-created archival digital prints, each in an edition of five, capture both the eye and the mind of the viewer. They're beautiful but not "pretty" and intellectually exciting without being didactic.  

Disturbing Reality (Review)

New group exhibit at the Weston shows art with a psychological bent

1 Comment · Wednesday, April 7, 2010
'Disturbing Reality' at the Weston Art Gallery is as much a group therapy session as a group exhibition. In addition to the expected scenes out of a child's anxiety closet, there are a surprising number of cathartic, even comforting, images. The nine artists in this circle seem to feed off one another.  

Shapeshifter (Review)

Local and regional shapeshifters artfully manipulate ordinary resources

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 31, 2010
In Country Club's current group show, much of the work is flat-out beautiful, while what isn't is still rewarding because it gives you plenty to think about. The show, continuing through April 10, resonates from artist to artist and is a pleasure to explore.  

Pencil Pushers

Local society chapter shows colored pencil as a true art form

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 23, 2010
Colored pencil art works? By grownups? If you thought the colored pencil was an artistic medium reserved for grade school, members of the Greater Cincinnati Chapter of the Colored Pencil Society of America will be quick to dissuade you. The group has a show up at the downtown YWCA right now that features multiple works from more than a dozen artists.  

Sampling Culture

Kara Walker, Shepard Fairey and the controversial art of appropriation

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 17, 2010
To see just how extensively appropriation is being used in contemporary art, it's useful to compare and contrast two traveling shows now in Cincinnati: Kara Walker's 'Harper's Pictorial History of the Civil War (Annotated)' at the Cincinnati Art Museum and Shepard Fairey's 'Supply and Demand' at the Contemporary Arts Center. The term "appropriation" is used to describe new art that incorporates in some way a pre-existing work into its imagery.  

Hope and Glory at the CAC

Shepard Fairey's contraversial 'street art' exhibit turns urban buildings into outdoor galleries

0 Comments · Monday, March 8, 2010
When it was announced last year that Shepard Fairey's traveling solo show 'Supply and Demand' would stop at the Contemporary Arts Center, it immediately seemed a masterstroke for the museum. One component of this exhibition involves Fairey working in public spaces and on mural projects, but not unauthorized graffiti. He and his crew ended up erecting seven paper murals downtown and in Northside.  

Dutch Utopia (Review)

Taft exhibition shows America in search of the Dutch Golden Age

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 3, 2010
Windmills, wooden clogs and tulip mania — that which we consider quintessentially Dutch might have a little something to do with American nostalgia. The Taft Museum of Art explores America's fascination with the Netherlands in 'Dutch Utopia: American Artists in Holland, 1880-1914.'   

Watching Art Unfold

Jay Bolotin unveils the latest piece in ongoing work-in-progress

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 24, 2010
In Bolotin’s world, art is untrammeled by category. This internationally recognized Cincinnati-based artist creates stories by making drawings, bas-reliefs, music and films. The current form of what will become the second section of the Jackleg Testament trilogy spills across gallery walls in an installation he calls “Leaves from a Cast Paper Novel.”