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Shapeshifter (Review)

Local and regional shapeshifters artfully manipulate ordinary resources

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 31, 2010
In Country Club's current group show, much of the work is flat-out beautiful, while what isn't is still rewarding because it gives you plenty to think about. The show, continuing through April 10, resonates from artist to artist and is a pleasure to explore.  

Pencil Pushers

Local society chapter shows colored pencil as a true art form

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 23, 2010
Colored pencil art works? By grownups? If you thought the colored pencil was an artistic medium reserved for grade school, members of the Greater Cincinnati Chapter of the Colored Pencil Society of America will be quick to dissuade you. The group has a show up at the downtown YWCA right now that features multiple works from more than a dozen artists.  

Sampling Culture

Kara Walker, Shepard Fairey and the controversial art of appropriation

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 17, 2010
To see just how extensively appropriation is being used in contemporary art, it's useful to compare and contrast two traveling shows now in Cincinnati: Kara Walker's 'Harper's Pictorial History of the Civil War (Annotated)' at the Cincinnati Art Museum and Shepard Fairey's 'Supply and Demand' at the Contemporary Arts Center. The term "appropriation" is used to describe new art that incorporates in some way a pre-existing work into its imagery.  

Hope and Glory at the CAC

Shepard Fairey's contraversial 'street art' exhibit turns urban buildings into outdoor galleries

0 Comments · Monday, March 8, 2010
When it was announced last year that Shepard Fairey's traveling solo show 'Supply and Demand' would stop at the Contemporary Arts Center, it immediately seemed a masterstroke for the museum. One component of this exhibition involves Fairey working in public spaces and on mural projects, but not unauthorized graffiti. He and his crew ended up erecting seven paper murals downtown and in Northside.  

Dutch Utopia (Review)

Taft exhibition shows America in search of the Dutch Golden Age

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 3, 2010
Windmills, wooden clogs and tulip mania — that which we consider quintessentially Dutch might have a little something to do with American nostalgia. The Taft Museum of Art explores America's fascination with the Netherlands in 'Dutch Utopia: American Artists in Holland, 1880-1914.'   

Watching Art Unfold

Jay Bolotin unveils the latest piece in ongoing work-in-progress

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 24, 2010
In Bolotin’s world, art is untrammeled by category. This internationally recognized Cincinnati-based artist creates stories by making drawings, bas-reliefs, music and films. The current form of what will become the second section of the Jackleg Testament trilogy spills across gallery walls in an installation he calls “Leaves from a Cast Paper Novel.”  

Hope and Glory

Shepard Fairey's grassroots success empowers other artists to make a statement

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 16, 2010
When it was announced last year that Shepard Fairey's traveling solo show Supply and Demand would stop at Cincinnati's Contemporary Arts Center, it immediately seemed a masterstroke for the museum. Once it opens Friday (continuing through Aug. 22), we'll see if the attendance and community interest live up to expectations.  

Starburst (Review)

A pivotal decade in photography explodes at Cincinnati Art Museum

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 9, 2010
It's hard for our generation to imagine controversy over color photography. In a day and age when many art schools have shut down their darkrooms in favor of digital, color is taken for granted. The Cincinnati Art Museum's 'Starburst: Color Photography in America 1970–1980,' opening Friday, explores when several artists changed the face of art photography forever.  

Personal Vistas (Review)

Kim Flora's large-scale encaustic paintings embrace turbulence and chaos

1 Comment · Wednesday, February 3, 2010
One of the last artists to benefit from Cincinnati's city-funded art grant program is Kim Flora. In 2008, she was awarded $6,000 to support the creation of the large-scale encaustic paintings that grace her exhibition 'Personal Vistas,' opening Feb. 5 at PAC Gallery in East Walnut Hills.  

How Could This Have Happened?

'Without Sanctuary' is a chilling reminder of America's shameful past

1 Comment · Wednesday, January 27, 2010
Convinced that no good can come of ignoring or forgetting a shameful aspect of American history (some 5,000 murderous, illegal lynchings, mostly of African-American males, from 1882 to 1968) the National Underground Railway Freedom Center has taken a traveling show that sometimes elicited anger in earlier venues and hopes to make it a means of furthering understanding rather than undermining it. 'Without Sanctuary: Lynching Photography in America' opened last week and runs through May 31.  

C. Spencer Yeh's Standard Deviation

In visual art and sound, local multimedia artist defies conventional boundaries

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 20, 2010
The cumulative impact of C. Spencer Yeh's loosely connected multimedia works at the CAC forces one to experience the world through his unique, sometimes alienating perspective — an approach the artist has investigated more prominently in his vast and various musical projects over the last dozen-plus years. Yeh's best-known musical entity is Burning Star Core, whose moody, cinematic soundscapes can be described as everything from avant-garde Free Jazz to experimental Noise Rock to the sound of the world caving in on itself.  

Points of Departure

Three artists wonder as they wander in their work

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 6, 2010
The three recently-opened exhibitions at downtown’s Weston Art Gallery in the Aronoff Center for the Arts couldn’t be more different, with Rick Mallette, Alice Pixley Young and Steve Zieverink each boasting their own flair.  

Space Is the Place

A look back at the year in alternative art spaces and exhibitions

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 30, 2009
Cincinnati’s vibrant community of alternative-exhibition spaces is my first love in this area. I am boastful of the innovations I witness in these unlikely places, where I not only exhibit my own installations but also, in several cases, help organize and curate exhibitions.   

Backyard Treasures

Manifest Gallery thinks locally, showcasing area artists

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 23, 2009
Casting a wide net is Manifest Gallery’s usual mode of operation. The “neighborhood gallery for the world” on Woodburn Avenue in East Walnut Hills attracts entries and exhibits works from all over this country and beyond. However, a current exhibition called Backyard reflects a deliberate narrowing of the field.  

The One That Got Away

Cincinnati helped save iconic Modernist mural, but wasn't able to keep it

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 16, 2009
“Swing Landscape” at 7-by-14 feet is quite large. It is a key piece by a giant of American Modernism whose work anticipated both Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. The Philadelphia-born Davis, who died in 1964 at age 71, was a champion of 20th-century European art and combined its influences with the American vernacular.