WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
Arts & Culture
 

Haunted History

The secrets, scares and sinister stories behind paranormal activity at Cincinnati landmarks

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 23, 2013
Dan Smith has been hunting ghosts for 18 years. As the author of multiple Cincinnati-centric paranormal investigation books including the new Ghosts of Bobby Mackey’s Music World, a traveling parascience technology inventor and speaker and the proprietor of the Haunted Cincinnati Tours ghost tour company, Smith laughs when he says that his whole life is based around “paranormal stuff.”
  

Grand Rapids’ ArtPrize Is a Grand Experiment

1 Comment · Wednesday, October 23, 2013
Grand Rapids, a city of less than 200,000 people in western Michigan, isn’t quite ready to be considered one of the Midwest’s great art centers; Cleveland, Chicago and Detroit’s art museums are not yet in danger of being eclipsed by Grand Rapids. But with its annual ArtPrize — a festival-like art exhibition and competition that occurs in late September and early October — it has come up with a citywide visual-arts event like no other in the way it’s captured the public imagination.  

'Swan Lake' Collaboration Brings Fully Staged Classic to Cincinnati

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 23, 2013
It’s perhaps the most iconic dance segment in the world-famous 19th-century ballet Swan Lake. It begins in Act II, when enchanted swan maidens, costumed in pristine white tutus, enter a moonlit lakeside scene one by one in what’s often been called the greatest possible accomplishment for a corps de ballet.
  

Dracula (Review)

A gothic treat

0 Comments · Tuesday, October 22, 2013
Dracula is a fun and well-timed gothic offering for theatergoers of all ages. This is a three-act dramatization from 1927, reduced to two with one intermission.   

Of Mice and Men (Review)

Great acting brings a callous world to life

0 Comments · Monday, October 21, 2013
Most of the characters in Of Mice and Men are victims of bigotry and persecution, and life is treated callously. Lennie and George’s friendship, built on familiarity and kindness, is sadly trampled by an uncaring world, quick to judge and destroy. This is a deeply moving production.
  

The Pages Of History

Looking back at 160 years of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County

1 Comment · Wednesday, October 16, 2013
If you wanted to borrow a book from a library in 18th-century America, you might run into some problems. Back then public libraries didn’t exist. Instead, small private libraries served those who were members — mainly upper-class citizens who could afford the annual fees.  

Learning Experiences: Cincy Shakes and Xavier Theater Collaborate

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Cincinnati Shakespeare Company is partnering with the theater program at Xavier University to stage Arthur Miller’s The Crucible. (Oct. 25- Nov. 3; tickets are $15-$30; 513-745-3939.) This came about because Stephen Skiles, who heads XU’s theater program, is friends with Brian Isaac Phillips, CSC’s artistic director. Skiles was an acting intern at the Cincinnati Playhouse 16 years ago when Phillips was recruited to fill out a cast.  

Nonprofit Produces Children's Songs About Pro-Social Behavior

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 16, 2013
David Kisor and Tom Lottman, a composer and researcher, respectively, work in harmony perpetually crafting a chorus of “strength-based” education for Growing Sound, a division of Children, Inc. that produces children’s songs and music videos to encourage pro-social learning in the early years of childhood.
  

Rapture, Blister, Burn (Review)

Women with issues

0 Comments · Monday, October 14, 2013
The play’s title, a distillation of its evolution of emotion and circumstance, is a lyric from an obscure Rock tune, and it’s an apt précis of the story’s arc. The script could easily have descended into a soap opera-like drama or a silly comedy, but it does not. Gionfriddo is a masterful writer of witty, provocative dialogue, and her characters are painfully real.
  

Music Beyond Genres

Constella Festival's Composer-in-Residence Missy Mazzoli defies convention

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 9, 2013
The Constella Festival got it right when they named Missy Mazzoli as this year’s composer-in-residence. At 33, she’s earned the awards, commissions and acclaim you’d expect from artists twice her age. And her two Constella concerts this year feature compositions she’s created since 2005, both for small ensembles and solo performance.
  

The Explosive Art of Peter Halley

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 9, 2013
Artists have long had an interest in serial imagery — repeatedly painting or making prints of such objects as haystacks (Monet), numerals (Jasper Johns) or flowers (Warhol). For the artist, it isn’t a rote, repetitious action — seeing how color, light or perspective changes the way you see an object makes one artwork as different from another as, well, night and day.
  

Photographer Michael E. Keating drops 'Cincinnati: Shadow & Light'

1 Comment · Wednesday, October 9, 2013
Michael E. Keating spent 34 years as a photojournalist at The Cincinnati Enquirer, where his vivid work gave readers views of the Queen City that could be beautiful, troubling or revealing — sometimes all at once and almost always imbued with an uncommon sense of humanity.  

Mike Birbiglia Tests New Material at a Favorite Local Club

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 9, 2013
Though he hails from Massachusetts and lives in New York City, Mike Birbiglia has an affinity for Cincinnati and Go Bananas Comedy Club. Through the fall, he will be visiting three of his favorite comedy clubs — including Go Bananas — to work out material for an upcoming theater tour, which will commence in January.  

Seven Spots on the Sun (Review)

Deep scars, painful memories

0 Comments · Monday, October 7, 2013
Wartime tortures its victims long beyond the battlefields and combat. Especially when a war tears apart the population of a single nation, the scars run deep, last long and profoundly change lives. That’s the circumstance of the characters in Martín Zimmerman’s Seven Spots on the Sun, receiving its world premiere at the Cincinnati Playhouse.    

The Bookseller

Neil Van Uum is back with a new store at Fountain Square

1 Comment · Wednesday, October 2, 2013
With the rise of Amazon, Netflix, iTunes and myriad other Internet-driven options, old-school brick-and-mortar book, video and music stores are evaporating at a rapid pace. It’s a distressing development for many of us who grew up wandering the aisles of such places, and that isn’t just nostalgia talking.