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Arts & Culture
 

Too Much of a Good Thing

The Divine Visitor at NKU's Y.E.S. Festival (Review)

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 22, 2015
The third play in Northern Kentucky University’s biennial Year End Series (Y.E.S.) Festival is David L. Williams' The Divine Visitor.   

Engaging Experiments

Near*By curatorial collective brings new ideas to the contemporary arts scene

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 15, 2015
Cincinnati has had its share of alternative spaces and indie nonprofit galleries — sometimes co-ops or collectives — where contemporary artists show their work and try out new ideas in curating, exhibiting and community engagement.   

MUSE Sings Works of Women Composers

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 15, 2015
Rachel DeVore Fogarty, Gwyneth Walker, Sarah Hopkins and Elizabeth Alexander are acclaimed composers whose music you may have never heard. MUSE, Cincinnati’s Women’s Choir, provides an opportunity to do so Saturday with two concerts titled Here and Aware.  

The Future of American Theater: a Report From Louisville

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 15, 2015
I spent last weekend in Kentucky at the Humana Festival of New American Plays at Actors Theatre of Louisville watching a half-dozen brand new works. The festival is an invigorating whirl of creativity, conviviality and engaging performances.  

The Cuckoo Clock Might Need Some Fine Tuning

0 Comments · Monday, April 13, 2015
When you hear the name Steve Martin, you surely think of a funny guy — "wild and crazy," in fact — both as an actor and a comedian. But he's also a playwright, and you have the opportunity to see one of his most amusing works at the Carnegie where The Underpants is onstage through April 26.  

The Art of Beer

Murals showcase past and present Cincinnati brews

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 7, 2015
While live music has always mixed well with alcohol, visual bar art in Cincinnati is starting to stretch beyond portraits of dogs playing poker and glowing beer signs.    

Warhol's Baseball Art Is a Hit at CAM

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 7, 2015
Turns out Pete Rose wasn’t the only baseball player that artist Andy Warhol ever depicted. He wasn’t even the only Red. Tom Seaver came first — but accidentally.  

MYCincinnati Youth Orchestra Fosters Development Through Social Change

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 7, 2015
Rehearsal for MYCincinnati, a free youth orchestra program in Price Hill, begins as Eddy Kwon, assistant program director, leads the Ambassador Ensemble, a string sextet of young musicians, in their practice.
  

A Jolly Romp Through a Problem Play

0 Comments · Monday, April 6, 2015
If you’ve ever seen The Taming of the Shrew, you might remember it as the tale of an ill-tempered woman brought into line by an abusive, gold-digging suitor. In  

Long Live the King

Julie Taymor transformed a cartoon into a blockbuster stage production

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 31, 2015
The Lion King began as a popular Disney animated feature film in 1994, but back then no one imagined that it would become a worldwide blockbuster stage production.  

Kiss Me, Kate

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 31, 2015
When I was a high school senior and the teacher who staged the school plays — her name was Mary Price — picked Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, there was a lot of moaning and groaning. Why do we have to perform in some dusty old play from centuries earlier?  

Regional Artists Explore the Boundaries of Landscapes in 'Now Here'

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Matt Distel’s smartly curated exhibition, Now Here: Theoretical Landscapes, is a broad sampling of more than 20 regional artists who mine personal and universal landscapes to present hypothetical meditations on locations of space and time. 
  

Going Underground with Jim DeBrosse

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Veteran newspaper reporter Jim DeBrosse’s Hidden City, set in, around and below the streets of Cincinnati, is a tour de force mystery thriller that also addresses many of the city’s social and political problems.  

'Buzzer' Is More About People Than Place

0 Comments · Monday, March 30, 2015
Tracey Scott Wilson is a playwright unafraid of the prickly issues of contemporary life. In Buzzer at the Cincinnati Playhouse, she tells a story that could be set in Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine. (It’s actually in New York City.)   

Heartbreak at Know Theatre

0 Comments · Monday, March 30, 2015
When I was a teenager, I devoured comic books ... I haven’t spent much time with those stories or characters for years, but Know Theatre’s production of Hearts Like Fists took me back to the days of two-dimensional characters, clear delineation between good and evil and lots of slam-bam action.