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Arts & Culture
 

Camelot (Review)

Strong acting redeems an unwieldy plot

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 29, 2013
In 1960, Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe followed their 1956 megahit My Fair Lady with the musical Camelot. Its arrival on Broadway coincided with the election of John Kennedy, and many people extended the vision of a “magical kingdom” to his ascendance as America’s charismatic 35th president.  

Abigail/1702 (Review)

Spectral sequel premieres at Cincinnati Playhouse

0 Comments · Saturday, January 26, 2013
Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa’s world premiere play, Abigail/1702, is the Mount Adams theater’s 66th premiere, and a positive sign that new artistic director Blake Robison will continue the company’s long tradition of fostering new theatrical works and emerging writers.  

Freud's Last Session (Review)

A whole lotta talking

0 Comments · Thursday, January 24, 2013
It’s Sept. 3, 1939. The father of psychoanalysis, Dr. Sigmund Freud, has invited to his London flat a young scholar of literature and theology from Oxford, C. S. Lewis.   

Ahead Of Their Time

How Ravi Shankar helped Cincinnati's urban revival

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 23, 2013
When Ravi Shankar died last month at age 92, Jim Tarbell’s thoughts turned to when he brought the great Indian classical musician to the historic — and endangered — St. Paul Church in the Pendleton District.    

Taft Museum Creates a Show From Its Fascinating Archives

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 23, 2013
Pages of History: 80 Years at the Taft was on view Aug. 10-Jan. 6, and I saw it on the last day. I found it so fascinating — and such a role model for a show about a cultural institution — that it’s worth discussing even though it’s over.  

Memphis (Review)

Broadway production takes risks lyrically exploring '50s racial divide

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 23, 2013
Memphis, the 2010 Tony Award winner for best musical, is loosely based on the story of a white disc jockey who crossed the color line and played black music on the radio in the racially divided Tennessee city, and it’s a story worth witnessing.  

Follow the 'Pulp Art' Paper Trail

1 Comment · Wednesday, January 23, 2013
My grandmother would say to me, in German, “Paper is patient,” explaining that one could write anything he or she wanted on paper, whether true or false. Though I’d always associated the quote with the written word, I was reminded of it while considering Pulp Art, a show by 11 paper artists at the Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center.  

High-Wire Act

Creator of 'Abigail/1702' grew up dreaming of being a playwright

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 15, 2013
Playwright Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa was in Chicago early in 2008, rehearsing the world premiere of a new play he had just written for Steppenwolf Theatre. The company was staging Arthur Miller’s legendary 1953 Tony Award winner, The Crucible, on its mainstage.
  

Change and Continuity Collide in 'Forward into the Past'

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 15, 2013
“Experimenting is what art is about,” Jens Rosenkrantz told his audience in the small, early 19th century rooms at Betts House last Saturday afternoon.  

Richard II (Review)

CSC portrays the fall of a king

0 Comments · Monday, January 14, 2013
Audiences seeing Richard II will wonder why it’s not presented more often because this production works so well. The common wisdom is that Richard II is more about head than heart. Shakespeare’s other histories are full of glory and combat, whereas this play focuses on a king whose weakness leads to his downfall.     

2012 Was a Great Year for Art Films

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 9, 2013
To say that 2012 was a great year for art films isn’t just a reference to the kind of foreign and American-indie narrative features, like Amour or Your Sister’s Sister, that are too thoughtful to play the multiplexes.  

Collective Security

Losantiville artists and designers collaborate to sustain viable small businesses

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 8, 2013
Six local companies make up Losantiville Collective, located on Main Street in Over-the-Rhine. The collective is owned by Dixon (Dixon Branded), Chris Heckman and Matt Anthony (co-founder, The LaunchWerks).   

Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk

By Ben Fountian (Ecco)

0 Comments · Thursday, January 3, 2013
A deadly firefight between U.S. forces and Iraqi insurgents is caught on video by a Fox News crew and before the eight surviving members of Bravo Company can get back to their barracks, the video has gone viral on the Internet.  

Monty Python's Flying Circus: Complete and Annotated

Edited by Luke Dempsey (Black Dog and Leventhal)

2 Comments · Thursday, January 3, 2013
The four English and one American gentlemen who came together at the end of the turbulent 1960s to form the comedy troupe known as Monty Python’s Flying Circus were highly intelligent, well-educated, profoundly funny, incredibly creative, incessantly silly, politically satirical, highly neurotic and explosively successful.  

Factory Boy

Brush Factory’s new furniture brand, Brighton Exchange, boasts handmade design

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 2, 2013
Hayes Shanesy and business partner/longtime romantic partner Rosie Kovacs recently created a separate arm to their growing business endeavor, the Brush Factory, focused exclusively on Shanesy’s wooden handcrafted furniture: Brighton Exchange.