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Arts & Culture
 

Nonprofit Produces Children's Songs About Pro-Social Behavior

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 16, 2013
David Kisor and Tom Lottman, a composer and researcher, respectively, work in harmony perpetually crafting a chorus of “strength-based” education for Growing Sound, a division of Children, Inc. that produces children’s songs and music videos to encourage pro-social learning in the early years of childhood.
  

Rapture, Blister, Burn (Review)

Women with issues

0 Comments · Monday, October 14, 2013
The play’s title, a distillation of its evolution of emotion and circumstance, is a lyric from an obscure Rock tune, and it’s an apt précis of the story’s arc. The script could easily have descended into a soap opera-like drama or a silly comedy, but it does not. Gionfriddo is a masterful writer of witty, provocative dialogue, and her characters are painfully real.
  

Music Beyond Genres

Constella Festival's Composer-in-Residence Missy Mazzoli defies convention

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 9, 2013
The Constella Festival got it right when they named Missy Mazzoli as this year’s composer-in-residence. At 33, she’s earned the awards, commissions and acclaim you’d expect from artists twice her age. And her two Constella concerts this year feature compositions she’s created since 2005, both for small ensembles and solo performance.
  

The Explosive Art of Peter Halley

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 9, 2013
Artists have long had an interest in serial imagery — repeatedly painting or making prints of such objects as haystacks (Monet), numerals (Jasper Johns) or flowers (Warhol). For the artist, it isn’t a rote, repetitious action — seeing how color, light or perspective changes the way you see an object makes one artwork as different from another as, well, night and day.
  

Photographer Michael E. Keating drops 'Cincinnati: Shadow & Light'

1 Comment · Wednesday, October 9, 2013
Michael E. Keating spent 34 years as a photojournalist at The Cincinnati Enquirer, where his vivid work gave readers views of the Queen City that could be beautiful, troubling or revealing — sometimes all at once and almost always imbued with an uncommon sense of humanity.  

Mike Birbiglia Tests New Material at a Favorite Local Club

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 9, 2013
Though he hails from Massachusetts and lives in New York City, Mike Birbiglia has an affinity for Cincinnati and Go Bananas Comedy Club. Through the fall, he will be visiting three of his favorite comedy clubs — including Go Bananas — to work out material for an upcoming theater tour, which will commence in January.  

Seven Spots on the Sun (Review)

Deep scars, painful memories

0 Comments · Monday, October 7, 2013
Wartime tortures its victims long beyond the battlefields and combat. Especially when a war tears apart the population of a single nation, the scars run deep, last long and profoundly change lives. That’s the circumstance of the characters in Martín Zimmerman’s Seven Spots on the Sun, receiving its world premiere at the Cincinnati Playhouse.    

The Bookseller

Neil Van Uum is back with a new store at Fountain Square

1 Comment · Wednesday, October 2, 2013
With the rise of Amazon, Netflix, iTunes and myriad other Internet-driven options, old-school brick-and-mortar book, video and music stores are evaporating at a rapid pace. It’s a distressing development for many of us who grew up wandering the aisles of such places, and that isn’t just nostalgia talking.  

Passing of Knowledge

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 2, 2013
A change in leadership is under way at Over-the-Rhine’s Know Theatre. Eric Vosmeier, producing artistic director for the past half-dozen years, is gradually handing over the reins to resident scenic and lighting designer Andrew Hungerford. Know, an adventurous and occasionally chaotic organization that began in 1997, is handling this evolution in a surprisingly orderly fashion.  

Back with Black

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 2, 2013
Back in 2006, Lewis Black told CityBeat in an interview that the Bush administration and the GOP were “fucking out of their minds.” So it is fortuitous that a recent interview took place on the second day of Texas Sen. Ted Cruz’s filibuster to protest the Affordable Care Act.
  

Early American Art Is 'Telling Tales' at the Taft

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 2, 2013
In 1850, when Robert S. Duncanson was painting landscapes on the hallways of what is now the Taft Museum of Art, art itself had a somewhat different place in popular culture than it has today. Duncanson’s landscapes are idealized scenes of nature and, as such, are considered uplifting.  

Photographic Memories

'Reverberation' exhibit showcases evocative live music photography during MidPoint

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 25, 2013
Might a picture be worth a thousand songs? It’s possible that a photograph, as much as an MP3 player full of tunes or a head full of memories, is the best way to recall attending a concert by a favorite act. Not just something shot far from the stage on your shaky iPhone, but rather the kind of image that an inspired photographer — with media access and lots of skill — can take up close.  

Painter Martin Tucker Loved the Supermarket

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 25, 2013
The current Martin Tucker: Remembered exhibit at the DAAP Galleries on the University of Cincinnati campus spotlights a local artist — a retired art professor who died this year — whose work showed a keen eye for the seductive, colorful quality of American consumer culture.  

Photographer Amy Hildebrand Finds Her Vision Through the Lens

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 25, 2013
There’s a secret behind Amy Hildebrand’s photography — a secret that I was never able to guess when we first met. As she peered through her camera lens and snapped images of my boyfriend and me with ease, she asked us to share our memories. Eventually, she shared some of her own and her secret came out. Hildebrand was born blind due to albinism...  

Ghost: The Musical (Review)

Musical based on film has more flash than heart

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 25, 2013
Producers of musical theater are always on the prowl for material that already has some emotional traction and romantic tales that were films when today’s audiences were young and in love are ripe for conversion into theatrical works. It’s possible to do this with some success, but I’m afraid that the folks who’ve translated the film into Ghost: The Musical didn’t have enough faith in the story.