What should I be doing instead of this?
 
WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
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Curtain Call
 

Politics and Theater

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 27, 2016
when I clicked on a Jimmy Kimmel Live! video a few months back and saw Matthew Broderick as Leo Bloom and Nathan Lane as Max Bialystock, I thought it was a scene from that Tony Award winner. They were hatching a scheme to make money — but this time not with a stinker of a Broadway show. Instead, they needed a stinker of a politician.  

The Perils of New Edgecliff Theatre

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 13, 2016
Once upon a time, popular theater was the realm of melodramas with dastardly villains, heroic champions and damsels in distress. New Edgecliff Theatre has experienced its own run of “perils” that seem to be the modern-day equivalent of the challenges faced in those long-ago productions.  

Cincy Shakes Plays its Part in Promoting the Bard

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 30, 2016
William Shakespeare died four centuries ago in 1616, but his impact on the world of theater seems stronger than ever today.   

Lisa Howard Began Her Broadway Career at CCM

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 16, 2016
A native of Akron, Ohio, Howard came to CCM in 1993. Her family supported her aspirations; only one high school teacher questioned her career plans. She’s proved that chemistry teacher wrong.  

New Plays in Louisville

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 2, 2016
The 40th-annual Humana Festival of New American Plays commences this week, presenting six shows in rotating repertory on the theater’s three stages through April 10.   

Their Education Is Entertainment for the Rest of Us

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 17, 2016
Don’t lose track of theater on university campuses, because there’s a lot of it. It’s a chance to see works that are less likely to be produced by theaters where selling lots of tickets is a necessity.  

Girl Power at the Playhouse

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 20, 2016
Nearly 30 percent of Playhouse premieres were written or co-created by women, significantly more than the 22-percent figure researched by the Lilly Awards and the Dramatists Guild for shows by women produced by American theaters during seasons between 2011 and 2014.
  

Writing About Theater

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 6, 2016
Last month I had an opportunity to attend an evening get-together with a group of volunteers with the League of Cincinnati Theatres who are writing regularly about local productions, providing previews of shows as well as critiques.  

Theater in New York City

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 9, 2015
In November I was in New York City for a gathering of the American Theatre Critics Association. I saw five Broadway shows, listened to some informative panel discussions and attended a luncheon at Sardi’s with an array of Broadway performers.  

Ed Stern’s ‘Youth’

0 Comments · Tuesday, November 24, 2015
Ed Stern “retired” three years ago after two decades of artistic leadership at the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park. I put quotation marks around that word because he’s still busy as can be, much to the surprise of everyone — himself included.  

Who’s on First?

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 11, 2015
I frequently extol the virtues of Cincinnati’s theaters. They are a subset, of course, of a vibrant arts scene — one that a friend of mine often says “fights above its weight class.”  

Common Ground: Creative and Weird

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 28, 2015
Trey Tatum and Paul Strickland grew up just 45 miles apart — Tatum in southern Alabama and Strickland in Florida’s Panhandle. But they didn’t meet until their paths crossed in Cincinnati during the Fringe Festival in June 2014.  

Fathers, Sons and Theatrical Honesty

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 14, 2015
Some plays become classics because they last across time — Shakespeare’s plays are still produced after 400 years. That’s what’s usually onstage at the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, but they also dig into more recent “classics,” qualified by elemental stories that burn fiercely.  

Struggling with Understanding: CCM’s ‘Pentecost’

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 30, 2015
Theater programs at our universities in Greater Cincinnati often produce shows that not only offer educational opportunities for students, but also expose us to works we have lost track of or missed. David Edgar’s Pentecost is such a work, and it accomplishes what Richard Hess likes to do — challenge audiences.   

‘Cyrano’ Fell From the Moon

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 16, 2015
Edmond Rostand’s play, like its hero, seems to have fallen unexpectedly from the moon. Cyrano de Bergerac was a surprising instant hit in Paris late in 1897. Its premiere received an hour-long standing ovation, and it was subsequently performed for 200 consecutive nights.