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Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 20, 2012
A beautiful married woman suddenly and mysteriously disappears and her husband immediately becomes the chief suspect in her murder. It’s a storyline so frequently used in books and films that it’s almost become a worn-out cliché. But that is definitely not the case in Gillian Flynn’s third and latest psychological thriller, Gone Girl.  

Chris Abani's Vehicle for Hope

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 13, 2012
The theme of The Mercantile Library’s Harriet Beecher Stowe Lecture series is “writing to change the world.” Few writers live up to that idea better than Chris Abani, who was imprisoned in his native Nigeria after the publication of his first novel, 1985’s Masters of the Board.
  

Literary Cincinnati by Dale Patrick Brown

0 Comments · Tuesday, May 22, 2012
Cincinnati writer Dale Patrick Brown says, in her lively new book Literary Cincinnati, the city “can point to an impressive literary history, but rarely does.” Brown proceeds to remedy the situation with eminently readable accounts of literary figures, homegrown and visiting.  

The Midwestern Native Garden by Charlotte Adelman and Bernard L. Schwartz

0 Comments · Tuesday, May 22, 2012
Although gardeners have always been drawn to the exotic, the authors of this book encourage exactly the opposite approach and eye non-native plants as encroachers. As gardeners themselves, this husband and wife team has transformed their own grounds from a traditional mixture of naturalized and native plants to one that harbors only natives to the benefit of birds, butterflies, bees and other life.  

Basil Balian Translates Popular French Series for American Readers

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 9, 2012
When Basil Balian was growing up in Iraq, everybody was reading a series of 19th century over-the-top stories of dark deeds and derring-do by a French writer, Pierre Alexis Ponson du Terrail. Rocambole, the unlikely hero of these tales, moves from bad guy to good guy in the course of numerous books charting his story.   

Dust To Dust by Benjamin Busch

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 10, 2012
Every once in a blue moon a book comes along that has the power to change the way we see our lives. That is exactly the case with an extraordinary new memoir titled Dust To Dust by Benjamin Busch.  

Anatomy of Injustice by Raymond Bonner

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 10, 2012
In January 1982, an elderly white woman in South Carolina named Dorothy Edwards was found murdered inside her home. After a botched investigation by local and state investigators and barely a shred of evidence, Edward Lee Elmore (or “Black Elmo,” as local cops liked to call him) was arrested, charged with the crime, quickly brought to trial, convicted and sentenced to death.  

The Real Romney

By Michael Kranish and Scott Helman

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 6, 2012
Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney is a political chameleon: a man of many faces and a past shrouded in mystery, half-truths and secrets. That’s according to The Real Romney, by Boston Globe reporters Michael Kranish and Scott Helman, the first comprehensive biography of the man many believe will be the 2012 Republican presidential nominee.  

11/22/63

By Stephen King

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 6, 2012
If you had a way to travel back in time and change the course of history, what would you do? If you’re Jake Epping, the mild-mannered Maine high school teacher who discovers a portal to the past in Stephen King’s latest classic, 11/22/63, you’d go back half a century and try to prevent the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.  

Daydream Nation

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 14, 2012
Dan Chaon grew up in rural Nebraska. Lonely and bored, he took refuge in his uncommonly active imagination. “It was one of those small elevator towns where there were like 15 people who lived there, and I was the only kid even close to my age,” Chaon says by phone from his current home in Cleveland.   

The Beauty and The Sorrow by Peter Englund

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 31, 2012
In his compelling new history, The Beauty and The Sorrow: An Intimate History of the First World War, historian Peter Englund has chosen firsthand accounts from 20 very different and disparate individuals who either fought in the war or were touched in some fashion by “The Great War,” as it has been called.  

The Outlaw Album by Daniel Woodrell

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 31, 2012
He calls his own prose “country noir” and writes about a very unique kind of American: people living their lives with nothing left to lose and operating on a level that many have described as “desperate.” Now, with the publication of 12 devastatingly gritty and somewhat surreal short stories in The Outlaw Album, 57-year-old Daniel Woodrell is finally getting the attention and respect that he deserves.   

Woolgathering by Patti Smith

New Directions Books

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 3, 2012
At her home in Michigan on the occasion of Pulitzer Prize-winning writer and former Punk rocker Patti Smith’s 45th birthday, the multitalented Smith crafted together a modest collection of memories from her childhood, vignettes, poems and tributes to other writers and performers like Sam Shepard.  

I Want My MTV by Craig Marks and Rob Tannenbaum

The Uncensored Story of the Music Video Revolution - Dutton

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 3, 2012
Began as one of the boldest and most audacious experiments and inventions in the history of entertainment, MTV has been a dominant force in popular culture since its launch in 1981.    

The Swerve: How the World Became Modern

Stephen Greenblatt, W.W. Norton & Company

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 21, 2011
It takes an intellectual scholar with the knowledge, depth and curiosity of Harvard professor Stephen Greenblatt to take a tale ancient and unknown and turn it into a compelling saga.