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Lit
 

The Bookseller

Neil Van Uum is back with a new store at Fountain Square

1 Comment · Wednesday, October 2, 2013
With the rise of Amazon, Netflix, iTunes and myriad other Internet-driven options, old-school brick-and-mortar book, video and music stores are evaporating at a rapid pace. It’s a distressing development for many of us who grew up wandering the aisles of such places, and that isn’t just nostalgia talking.  

Night Film

by Marisha Pessl (Random House)

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 4, 2013
Written with hip, smart and exquisitely brilliant prose, Marisha Pessl’s latest novel, Night Film, is like a roller coaster ride through the haunted house at the wildest amusement park ever built. It’s a spine-tingling journey covering enormous territory as it delves into the deep recesses of the human psyche.  

The Maid's Version

Daniel Woodrell (Little, Brown and Company)

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 4, 2013
Daniel Woodrell is clearly among the best living American writers when it comes to evoking the sights, sounds and even the smell of the blood-soaked terrain on which most of his novels take place. Described by some as the master of “country noir,” Woodrell is incredibly gifted at describing small towns of the Missouri Ozarks while also delivering pitch-perfect dialogue straight out of those hills.  

Fiona Maazel's Latest Novel Follows a Cult in Cincinnati

1 Comment · Wednesday, August 28, 2013
Compelling, contemplative and laugh-out-loud funny, Fiona Maazel’s latest novel, Woke Up Lonely, is a sprawling story of a wildly popular cult, the Helix, which promises a cure for loneliness.  

Maps, Magazines, Money

Handsome book explores printing trade in 19th-century Cincinnati

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 24, 2013
The Engraving Trade in Early Cincinnati: With a Brief Account of the Beginning of the Lithograph Trade is a beautiful book, as it should be, given its subject matter. In the early years of the 19th century, images in publications were the way people saw the world beyond their own experience.  

Psychic Sisters

Cincinnati native Curtis Sittenfeld returns with a new novel about twin sisters with supernatural powers

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 10, 2013
Sisterland, the freshly minted fourth novel by Cincinnati native Curtis Sittenfeld, centers on twin sisters Kate and Violet, who have the unique psychic ability to see future events, among other less vital factoids.  

Lauren Groff's Paradise Lost (and Mostly Regained)

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 27, 2013
Lauren Groff’s engrossing second novel, Arcadia, centers on the first child born in an upstate New York commune where utopian ideals inevitably clash with the darker side of human nature.  

Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk

By Ben Fountian (Ecco)

0 Comments · Thursday, January 3, 2013
A deadly firefight between U.S. forces and Iraqi insurgents is caught on video by a Fox News crew and before the eight surviving members of Bravo Company can get back to their barracks, the video has gone viral on the Internet.  

Monty Python's Flying Circus: Complete and Annotated

Edited by Luke Dempsey (Black Dog and Leventhal)

2 Comments · Thursday, January 3, 2013
The four English and one American gentlemen who came together at the end of the turbulent 1960s to form the comedy troupe known as Monty Python’s Flying Circus were highly intelligent, well-educated, profoundly funny, incredibly creative, incessantly silly, politically satirical, highly neurotic and explosively successful.  

Words With Friends

Northside-based nonprofit promotes literacy in local youth

0 Comments · Tuesday, November 27, 2012
What first started as a community forum to reach neighborhood children resulted in a nonprofit organization called WordPlay, which offers a place outside the home where kids can get tutoring and work on creative projects that aim to create confidence and allow for positive social engagement.   

May We Be Forgiven

By A.M. Homes

0 Comments · Tuesday, November 20, 2012
Pity poor Harold Silver, the loveable protagonist in A.M. Homes’ latest and perhaps finest novel, May We Be Forgiven. Set over the course of one nightmarish year, from one disastrous family Thanksgiving to the next year’s “remains of the day,” Homes has cooked up the blackest of comedies.  

Bruce

By Peter Ames Carlin

0 Comments · Tuesday, November 20, 2012
Less than a year ago, word began circulating of a new “definitive” biography of Rock and Roll icon Bruce Springsteen. These rumors were like manna from heaven for frustrated Springsteen fans, who have been waiting for decades for this kind of biography. And who could blame them?  

Camille Paglia's Inclusive 'Journey Through Art'

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 7, 2012
Long an incisive cultural critic, a dedicated teacher and a nimble-minded writer, Camille Paglia is known for her polarizing opinions on everything from politics (she’s voting Green Party this year) to pop culture (she recently confessed her love for Real Housewives of New Jersey, which she says is a more accurate depiction of the state’s residents than The Sopranos, which she hated).
  

Junot Diaz’s Yunior Finds Hope Amidst Heartache

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 10, 2012
Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Junot Diaz is on the phone with me from Los Angeles, where he’s beginning a book tour to mark the release of his second collection of short stories, This Is How You Lose Her, some 16 years in the making.  

A Library All Their Own

Little Free Libraries build community, share favorite reads

2 Comments · Wednesday, September 19, 2012
There’s a little red house mounted to a wooden stand in front of Afsaneh Fowler’s home in Loveland. At first glance, it looks like a bird feeder or a dollhouse or maybe even a quirky mailbox. It’s actually a Little Free Library, a homemade, DIY, old-fashioned community investment that connects neighbors, books and ideas.