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Lit
 

David Bell Continues His Mysterious Ways in ‘The Forgotten Girl’

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 8, 2014
Cincinnati native David Bell’s latest thriller, The Forgotten Girl, centers on Jason Danvers, a 45-year-old graphic designer in small-town Ohio whose comfortable existence is seriously altered when his wayward younger sister re-enters his life.
  

Fourth of July Creek

Smith Henderson (Ecco)

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 27, 2014
First-time novelist Smith Henderson’s Fourth of July Creek is the story of a social worker named Pete Snow who is caught in the web of a world gone wrong.
  

High as the Horses Bridles

Scott Cheshire (Henry Holt and Company)

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 27, 2014
High as the Horses’ Bridles, the debut novel by Scott Cheshire, is about what happens after a 12-year-old boy-prophet named Josiah Laudermilk delivers an impassioned apocalyptic sermon to a group of about 3,000 impassioned faithful.  

Walking the Steps of Cincinnati: A Guide to the Queen City’s Scenic and Historic Secrets

Mary Anna DuSablon Revised by Connie J. Harrell and John Cicmanec (Ohio University Press)

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 25, 2014
Walking the Steps of Cincinnati: A Guide to the Queen City’s Scenic and Historic Secrets is a wholly delightful book that first appeared in 1998 and returns in a revised edition as the weather invites taking full advantage of its subject matter.   

Love and Terror

Dorothy Weil (AuthorHouse)

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 25, 2014
Dorothy Weil’s new novel, Love and Terror, takes place in a past so recent that we’ve all been there — the middle of the 21st century’s first decade — and is set in a place we know just as well, Cincinnati.
  

Visions of Cincinnati

The Cincinnati Anthology looks at our rapidly changing city in myriad ways

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 4, 2014
Cincinnati is changing. Nowhere is this fact more apparent than in our once-sleepy downtown. From The Banks to Over-the-Rhine, from Fountain Square to Washington Park, the urban core is alive with activity.
  

To Rise Again At A Decent Hour

Joshua Ferris (Little, Brown and Company)

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 14, 2014
While it may indeed be an urban folk tale that dentists have a higher rate of suicide than other professions, there’s no doubt that, like pimpin’, dentistry ain’t easy.  

The Corpse Exhibition

Hassan Blasim (Translated by Jonathan Wright) (Penguin Books)

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 14, 2014
Since our botched invasion and futile occupation of Iraq, there have been several excellent accounts of this costly, deadly debacle —unfortunately all written from the perspective of American and other Western-based writers.  

Queen City Reading

A cornucopia of Cinci-centric books hits the market

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 29, 2014
It’s not so unusual when local authors write books about this region — there’s a burgeoning market for it, actually, in Cincinnati and elsewhere.
  

Rust Belt Prophet

Author David Giffels discusses his ode to Akron

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 18, 2014
Rust Belt towns across the upper Midwest are on the verge of oblivion, their economies hallowed out by technological innovation and globalization. Yet many are not ready to give up on blue-collar bastions like Akron, Ohio, as David Giffels’ new book attests.
  

Looking at the Past Through a Child's Eye

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 19, 2014
Since the publication of Noblesville, Ind., author Susan Crandall’s Whistling Past the Graveyard, readers have been falling in love with both the novel and its precocious 9-year-old narrator, Starla Claudelle. For Crandall, the award-winning author of nine previous novels, this release is a departure of sorts  

Total Immersion

Acclaimed novelist Rachel Kushner discusses her approach to writing

1 Comment · Wednesday, January 29, 2014
Rachel Kushner’s The Flamethrowers is rightly being hailed as one the of the best novels in recent memory, a deeply immersive book marked by incisive cultural observations and a vividly descriptive prose style that is drawing comparisons to everyone from Flaubert to Don DeLillo.  

The Goldfinch

Donna Tartt (Little, Brown and Co.)

0 Comments · Tuesday, December 31, 2013
Since bursting onto the literary stage in 1992 to huge acclaim and equally impressive sales with The Secret History, Donna Tartt has been content to immerse herself in her writing, publishing only two other books since.  

The Circle

Dave Eggers (Knopf/McSweeney's)

0 Comments · Tuesday, December 31, 2013
"It’s heaven.” Those are the words Mae Holland uses to describe her first day at work at The Circle, a futuristic, high-tech consumer interface and the world’s biggest Internet company, which is at the center of Dave Eggers’ latest novel.  

The Pages Of History

Looking back at 160 years of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County

1 Comment · Wednesday, October 16, 2013
If you wanted to borrow a book from a library in 18th-century America, you might run into some problems. Back then public libraries didn’t exist. Instead, small private libraries served those who were members — mainly upper-class citizens who could afford the annual fees.