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Rust Belt Prophet

Author David Giffels discusses his ode to Akron

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 18, 2014
Rust Belt towns across the upper Midwest are on the verge of oblivion, their economies hallowed out by technological innovation and globalization. Yet many are not ready to give up on blue-collar bastions like Akron, Ohio, as David Giffels’ new book attests.
  

Looking at the Past Through a Child's Eye

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 19, 2014
Since the publication of Noblesville, Ind., author Susan Crandall’s Whistling Past the Graveyard, readers have been falling in love with both the novel and its precocious 9-year-old narrator, Starla Claudelle. For Crandall, the award-winning author of nine previous novels, this release is a departure of sorts  

Total Immersion

Acclaimed novelist Rachel Kushner discusses her approach to writing

1 Comment · Wednesday, January 29, 2014
Rachel Kushner’s The Flamethrowers is rightly being hailed as one the of the best novels in recent memory, a deeply immersive book marked by incisive cultural observations and a vividly descriptive prose style that is drawing comparisons to everyone from Flaubert to Don DeLillo.  

The Goldfinch

Donna Tartt (Little, Brown and Co.)

0 Comments · Tuesday, December 31, 2013
Since bursting onto the literary stage in 1992 to huge acclaim and equally impressive sales with The Secret History, Donna Tartt has been content to immerse herself in her writing, publishing only two other books since.  

The Circle

Dave Eggers (Knopf/McSweeney's)

0 Comments · Tuesday, December 31, 2013
"It’s heaven.” Those are the words Mae Holland uses to describe her first day at work at The Circle, a futuristic, high-tech consumer interface and the world’s biggest Internet company, which is at the center of Dave Eggers’ latest novel.  

The Pages Of History

Looking back at 160 years of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County

1 Comment · Wednesday, October 16, 2013
If you wanted to borrow a book from a library in 18th-century America, you might run into some problems. Back then public libraries didn’t exist. Instead, small private libraries served those who were members — mainly upper-class citizens who could afford the annual fees.  

Photographer Michael E. Keating drops 'Cincinnati: Shadow & Light'

1 Comment · Wednesday, October 9, 2013
Michael E. Keating spent 34 years as a photojournalist at The Cincinnati Enquirer, where his vivid work gave readers views of the Queen City that could be beautiful, troubling or revealing — sometimes all at once and almost always imbued with an uncommon sense of humanity.  

The Bookseller

Neil Van Uum is back with a new store at Fountain Square

1 Comment · Wednesday, October 2, 2013
With the rise of Amazon, Netflix, iTunes and myriad other Internet-driven options, old-school brick-and-mortar book, video and music stores are evaporating at a rapid pace. It’s a distressing development for many of us who grew up wandering the aisles of such places, and that isn’t just nostalgia talking.  

Night Film

by Marisha Pessl (Random House)

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 4, 2013
Written with hip, smart and exquisitely brilliant prose, Marisha Pessl’s latest novel, Night Film, is like a roller coaster ride through the haunted house at the wildest amusement park ever built. It’s a spine-tingling journey covering enormous territory as it delves into the deep recesses of the human psyche.  

The Maid's Version

Daniel Woodrell (Little, Brown and Company)

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 4, 2013
Daniel Woodrell is clearly among the best living American writers when it comes to evoking the sights, sounds and even the smell of the blood-soaked terrain on which most of his novels take place. Described by some as the master of “country noir,” Woodrell is incredibly gifted at describing small towns of the Missouri Ozarks while also delivering pitch-perfect dialogue straight out of those hills.  

Fiona Maazel's Latest Novel Follows a Cult in Cincinnati

1 Comment · Wednesday, August 28, 2013
Compelling, contemplative and laugh-out-loud funny, Fiona Maazel’s latest novel, Woke Up Lonely, is a sprawling story of a wildly popular cult, the Helix, which promises a cure for loneliness.  

Maps, Magazines, Money

Handsome book explores printing trade in 19th-century Cincinnati

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 24, 2013
The Engraving Trade in Early Cincinnati: With a Brief Account of the Beginning of the Lithograph Trade is a beautiful book, as it should be, given its subject matter. In the early years of the 19th century, images in publications were the way people saw the world beyond their own experience.  

Psychic Sisters

Cincinnati native Curtis Sittenfeld returns with a new novel about twin sisters with supernatural powers

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 10, 2013
Sisterland, the freshly minted fourth novel by Cincinnati native Curtis Sittenfeld, centers on twin sisters Kate and Violet, who have the unique psychic ability to see future events, among other less vital factoids.  

Lauren Groff's Paradise Lost (and Mostly Regained)

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 27, 2013
Lauren Groff’s engrossing second novel, Arcadia, centers on the first child born in an upstate New York commune where utopian ideals inevitably clash with the darker side of human nature.  

Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk

By Ben Fountian (Ecco)

0 Comments · Thursday, January 3, 2013
A deadly firefight between U.S. forces and Iraqi insurgents is caught on video by a Fox News crew and before the eight surviving members of Bravo Company can get back to their barracks, the video has gone viral on the Internet.