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Mike Wade

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0 Comments · Wednesday, May 19, 2004
Then: In 1999, CityBeat profiled local Jazz musician Mike Wade, a trumpeter struggling to find his niche here. He was balancing a teaching career with a performance career, wondering if he should   

Larry Flynt and Hustler

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0 Comments · Wednesday, May 5, 2004
Then: In January 1997, CityBeat's Steve Ramos caught up with Larry and Jimmy Flynt just as the film The People vs. Larry Flynt was hitting theaters across the country. In a town that once saw a   

Donald Anthony Jr. and fencing

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0 Comments · Wednesday, April 21, 2004
Then: In 1996, Donald Anthony Jr. was working hard to bring fencing to the forefront in Cincinnati. His fencing resume included the 1995 U.S. World Championship Team and the 1994 U.S. National Cha  

Teresa Melgard and Kelly Robinson

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0 Comments · Wednesday, April 14, 2004
Then: In 1996, CityBeat wrote about Teresa Melgard and Kelly Robinson, two women in a committed relationship who were raising a daughter in Mason and fighting for equal protection under the law.   

Contemporary Arts Center

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0 Comments · Wednesday, April 7, 2004
Then: In 1998, CityBeat reported on the planning stages of the new Contemporary Arts Center (CAC). Three architects had been selected for interviews, and Charles Desmarais, then executive director  

Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival

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0 Comments · Wednesday, March 31, 2004
Then: In 1997, CityBeat reported that the three-year-old Fahrenheit Theatre Company was changing its name to the Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival (CSF) in order to more accurately reflect what they  

Bill Cunningham and Who Must Go

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0 Comments · Wednesday, March 24, 2004
Then: In 1996, CityBeat polled Cincinnatians and readers and asked them to choose "Who Must Go." The poll involved 1,200 randomly selected households, with about 10 percent of them returning their su  

Sherith Israel Synagogue

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0 Comments · Wednesday, March 17, 2004
Then: In 1997, CityBeat reported on a controversy surrounding the site of a former synagogue downtown. The building was deemed "the oldest synagogue west of the Allegheny Mountains," and, though  

Darren Blase, Syd Nathan and King Records

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0 Comments · Wednesday, March 10, 2004
Then: In 1997, Shake It Records owner Darren Blase was on a crusade to get the word out about Syd Nathan and King Records. Between 1943 and 1971, Blase told CityBeat readers, King Records "revolu  

Photographer Brad Smith

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0 Comments · Wednesday, March 3, 2004
Then: In 1998, CityBeat featured photographer Brad Smith on its cover. Smith was hailed by Steve Ramos as a "guerilla photographer" who "pushes the envelope of erotic art." In a conservative   

Benjamin Britton

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0 Comments · Wednesday, February 25, 2004
Then: In 1997, CityBeat took a look forward to the new millennium. Writers and readers were concerned with the Human Genome Project, water on the moon, life on Mars, cosmetic surgery, bio-warfare   

Community supported agriculture

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0 Comments · Wednesday, February 18, 2004
Then: In April 1995, CityBeat introduced many readers to the concept of community supported agriculture (CSA). In a nutshell, CSA pairs consumers with a farm close to home. "A group of consumers (con  

University of Cincinnati

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0 Comments · Wednesday, February 11, 2004
Then: In January 1996, CityBeat explored the largest employer in town -- not Procter & Gamble, the city of Cincinnati or General Electric, but the University of Cincinnati. The story contained lot  

Stacy Sims

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0 Comments · Wednesday, January 28, 2004
Then: In January 2003, CityBeat stretched readers' minds and introduced them to Stacy Sims and pilates. Sims discovered pilates while working as a PR and marketing director in Cleveland and livin  

Oyler Elementary School

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0 Comments · Wednesday, January 14, 2004
Then: In 1997, CityBeat's "Stories of Eighth and State" looked at Lower Price Hill through the eyes of several neighborhood institutions, including Oyler Elementary. "Oyler stands alone as Low