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On Second Thought
 

No Images = No Stories

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 14, 2014
It’s taken almost a month for the story of hundreds of kidnapped Nigerian school girls to gain a foothold in the American news media.
  

Considering the "Double Effect"

1 Comment · Wednesday, April 30, 2014
My undergraduate journalism students never were livelier than when they explored what philosophers and ethicists call the Principle of the Double Effect.  

Orchids and Onions for Our Sole Surviving Daily

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 15, 2014
It’s Orchids and Onions, Darts and Flowers for Curmudgeon’s home-delivered Enquirer.   

Why CNN Had Malaysia Flight 370 All to Itself

1 Comment · Wednesday, April 2, 2014
Imagine when CNN wasn’t there to cover a world-class breaking news story.
  

Sloppy Reporting Mars Interesting Ark Questions

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 19, 2014
 Whatever it is, the Ark planned by Answers in Genesis (AiG) won’t be a “replica.”
  

Henry Heimlich’s New Book Deserves Informed Reviews

1 Comment · Wednesday, March 5, 2014
Every reporter has undertaken some assignment without a chance for adequate preparation. It comes with daily journalism.  

Considering WCPO's Paywall

2 Comments · Wednesday, February 19, 2014
WCPO.com installed its promised paywall for some online stories. The only question is, “Is it worth it?”  

'Guns & Ammo' Columnist Was Right — and Paid the Price

8 Comments · Wednesday, February 5, 2014
When a magazine’s troubles make it to the front page of the New York Times business section, it’s officially a media story.
  

Industrial Pollutants and the Ohio River

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 22, 2014
The recent spill of the chemical MCHM in West Virginia recalled an era when our drinking water wasn’t so well protected from industrial pollutants. 
  

Considering Confirmation Bias at CBS News

0 Comments · Tuesday, December 31, 2013
We can learn from CBS News’ retreat from another major story after fiercely defending its veracity. The primary lesson is the havoc that “confirmation bias” can inflict on news gathering.  

Covering Mandela in '63

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 11, 2013
Listening to BBC after Nelson Mandela died left me sleep deprived. It was virtually nonstop from midnight to 5 a.m. on WVXU, and BBC demonstrated how a first-class news organization covers a major story.  

The Macabre Entertainment of JFK Assassination Commemorations

0 Comments · Tuesday, November 26, 2013
Fifty years after JFK was killed, I still don’t get the popular fascination with him. And until someone convinces me that it matters to our public policy today, I really don’t care who killed him or what was behind those fatal shots in Dallas.  

Remembering Cairo in 1979

0 Comments · Monday, November 18, 2013
Today, from every news medium I read or hear, Cairo and much of Egypt outside the capital are suffering a nasty hangover from a soured “Arab Spring.”
  

Suggesting Ingredients in a Federal Shield Law

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 30, 2013
I still object to shield laws. They are a de facto form of licensing reporters. You are your sources are unprotected  if you’re not included in the definition of “journalist” or your work isn’t considered “journalism.”  

Remembering Better Days: The Sinai Peninsula

1 Comment · Monday, October 14, 2013
When I was there, Sinai seemed idyllic. Today, it’s a deadly trap for Egyptian police and military and a no-go land for tourists.