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Did You Know?

Facts and figures about Greater Cincinnati colleges and universities

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 11, 2010
Cincinnati has a long history in education. Did you know the Art Academy of Cincinnati is one of only five museum schools in the U.S.? Read on to learn about UC, Miami, Xavier and other schools in our area. You can even learn which local program, despite our economy, has had 100% job placement for the last 15 years.  

Parking Rate Increase Bumps City to Top

Critics say amount of hike is too much

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 11, 2010
If you work, do business or have come downtown for dinner in the past few days you've probably noticed you need some extra change to park on the street. In the past week, the city began phasing in its new parking rate structure, doubling the cost for street parking downtown from $1 to $2 per hour. It costs more to park in city-owned lots and garages, too.  

Fuel for Thought

Locals make own biodiesel in garage

2 Comments · Tuesday, August 10, 2010
Ollie Kroner's car doesn't look all that different. True, a mid-1980s Mercedes sedan in decent shape will turn a few heads but it's not the kind of vehicle meant to draw attention. There is the emblem, though: a few letters added as a prefix to the engine designation on the trunk, turning "turbodiesel" into "bioturbodiesel."  

Brother, Can You Spare Some Ideas?

County officials turn to citizens for input

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 4, 2010
Hamilton County officials are asking residents for help in determining what course of action to take to solve some of the most severe budget issues the county has ever faced. Ideas about what residents expect from county government and how they would solve funding dilemmas are being solicited through the 2011 Hamilton County Citizens Survey.  

Engulfed

BP spill disrupts the lives of gulf residents

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 4, 2010
In July, local photographer Cathryn Lovely and writer Judy George traveled to Hopedale and Grand Isle, La. What they found were two towns coming to terms with the idea that their waterways, their fish, their birds, their privacy, their sense of community — essentially, their ways of life — would be swallowed up by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil explosion in the Gulf of Mexico.  

Cuts in HIV Drug Program Could Prove Fatal

Without meds, 'you will get sick and you will die'

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 28, 2010
The latest round of state budget cuts literally is a matter of life and death to some of the people affected. More than 5,000 people use the Ohio HIV Drug Assistance Program (ODAP) to get expensive life-saving medications that treat HIV. Recent government belt-tightening, however, has led to a first-time waiting list and other major cost containment measures for the 20-year-old program.  

Challenging a Broken System

A true socialist, LaBotz runs for U.S. Senate seat

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 28, 2010
Dan LaBotz understands his campaign to become Ohio's next member of the U.S. Senate is a bit of a curiosity. As Republicans and Tea Party members continue to throw around the term “socialist” as a sort of epithet, LaBotz, a Clifton resident, is one of just three national candidates from the Socialist Party, and the only one running for a Senate seat.  

Renovation or Gentrification?

Washington Park's makeover reignites old debate in OTR

6 Comments · Wednesday, July 21, 2010
Due to budget constraints, the Cincinnati Recreation Commission decided not to open a few city pools this summer, including the pool in the soon-to-be-renovated Washington Park. The park, located in Over-the-Rhine near Music Hall, is the latest development site for 3CDC and will include a state-of-the-art playground with an interactive water feature, play castle, climbing hill, swing set, dog park, interactive stream and sand pit with water sources nearby.  

Justice Now a Partisan Affair

Kentucky ruling could affect how Ohio elects judges

0 Comments · Tuesday, July 20, 2010
A federal appeals court recently made a groundbreaking decision that will change the way judicial candidates run for office in Kentucky and has some experts worried about how it could potentially impact Ohio judicial elections and the impartiality of judges. The Sixth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals struck down the rules used in Kentucky for electing judges, stating the current rules violate the candidates' First Amendment right to freedom of speech.   

Taking on a Champion

Sharonville factory workers prepare for union vote

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 14, 2010
Employees at Champion Windows' Sharonville manufacturing facility are scheduled to vote July 21 on a move to join the Iron Workers Shopmen's Union. If approved, the move would lead to contract negotiations between the company and the labor union over working conditions and wages. Proponents of workers' rights say it's a much-needed change at the facility.  

Breaking the Code of Silence

Court ruling means Pope, bishops might testify in abuse cases

2 Comments · Tuesday, July 13, 2010
Two weeks ago, when the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal from the Vatican, plaintiffs claiming to be sexually abused at the hands of priests and betrayed by the church's effort to keep those crimes quiet earned their biggest court victory to date. In fact, after decades of losses, it felt like the victims' first real win, says Judy Jones, the Midwest associate director of the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests (SNAP).  

From the Bottom Up

Movement organizing to force changes in school funding

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 7, 2010
Like most school districts in Ohio, times are especially tough right now for Cincinnati Public Schools. The district is scrambling to organize a balanced budget for the upcoming academic year, while attempting to avoid cutting as many extracurricular activities and jobs as possible. Help might be on the way, however, in the form of a citizen-led movement that's lobbying state officials to provide equal educational opportunities and funding for public schools across Ohio.  

City: Streetcars Lessen Need for Parking

Zoning change affects mostly future parking, not present spaces

1 Comment · Tuesday, July 6, 2010
In mid-June, the Cincinnati Planning Commission approved a change in the city's zoning code that, on the surface, seemed to trigger a looming reduction in the number of existing downtown parking spaces. Actually, the revision is meant to be prospective, not retroactive, in its intent, reducing by half the current requirement that development projects include two parking spaces for each residential unit added.  

The Great Gay Migration

Why are so many young gay professionals leaving Cincinnati?

2 Comments · Wednesday, June 30, 2010
The story is as old as time: Plucky young adults, stymied by small-town culture and fueled by grandiose dreams, flee for the bright lights of the big city. It might sound like a story book or a 'Sex and the City' script, but it happens all the time. In fact, it's happening right now in Cincinnati.  

Cincinnati Police Rarely Use Hate Crime Law

Local number of cases lower than in comparable cities

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 30, 2010
The last decade has seen the repeal of Article 12 and adoption of the Human Rights Ordinance, both huge victories for Cincinnati's LGBTQ community. But since Article 12's repeal in 2004, Cincinnati Police have processed just seven hate crime charges based on sexual orientation, compared to 19 in Columbus in 2007 alone. Local gay rights advocates say the incidents are being under-reported or under-pursued by police.