WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
Home · Articles · News · News
News
 

Taking on a Champion

Sharonville factory workers prepare for union vote

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 14, 2010
Employees at Champion Windows' Sharonville manufacturing facility are scheduled to vote July 21 on a move to join the Iron Workers Shopmen's Union. If approved, the move would lead to contract negotiations between the company and the labor union over working conditions and wages. Proponents of workers' rights say it's a much-needed change at the facility.  

Breaking the Code of Silence

Court ruling means Pope, bishops might testify in abuse cases

2 Comments · Tuesday, July 13, 2010
Two weeks ago, when the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal from the Vatican, plaintiffs claiming to be sexually abused at the hands of priests and betrayed by the church's effort to keep those crimes quiet earned their biggest court victory to date. In fact, after decades of losses, it felt like the victims' first real win, says Judy Jones, the Midwest associate director of the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests (SNAP).  

From the Bottom Up

Movement organizing to force changes in school funding

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 7, 2010
Like most school districts in Ohio, times are especially tough right now for Cincinnati Public Schools. The district is scrambling to organize a balanced budget for the upcoming academic year, while attempting to avoid cutting as many extracurricular activities and jobs as possible. Help might be on the way, however, in the form of a citizen-led movement that's lobbying state officials to provide equal educational opportunities and funding for public schools across Ohio.  

City: Streetcars Lessen Need for Parking

Zoning change affects mostly future parking, not present spaces

1 Comment · Tuesday, July 6, 2010
In mid-June, the Cincinnati Planning Commission approved a change in the city's zoning code that, on the surface, seemed to trigger a looming reduction in the number of existing downtown parking spaces. Actually, the revision is meant to be prospective, not retroactive, in its intent, reducing by half the current requirement that development projects include two parking spaces for each residential unit added.  

The Great Gay Migration

Why are so many young gay professionals leaving Cincinnati?

2 Comments · Wednesday, June 30, 2010
The story is as old as time: Plucky young adults, stymied by small-town culture and fueled by grandiose dreams, flee for the bright lights of the big city. It might sound like a story book or a 'Sex and the City' script, but it happens all the time. In fact, it's happening right now in Cincinnati.  

Cincinnati Police Rarely Use Hate Crime Law

Local number of cases lower than in comparable cities

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 30, 2010
The last decade has seen the repeal of Article 12 and adoption of the Human Rights Ordinance, both huge victories for Cincinnati's LGBTQ community. But since Article 12's repeal in 2004, Cincinnati Police have processed just seven hate crime charges based on sexual orientation, compared to 19 in Columbus in 2007 alone. Local gay rights advocates say the incidents are being under-reported or under-pursued by police.  

A Minority Within a Minority

Gay African Americans face discrimination from all sides

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 30, 2010
Cincinnati is a city that's often struggled with tolerance, though things have been improving over the past decade. Still, it can be a struggle to be both black and gay — a minority within a minority — in a socially conservative city. "I know people look down upon it," says Isaiah Powell, a criminal justice student at UC. "You're supposed to be a man and support your family."  

Once Common Disease Returns

Local syphilis cases on the rise

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 23, 2010
Syphilis was once so common that some people viewed the potentially fatal disease as a natural stage of life. Nowadays, most sexually active people think syphilis is a relic of the past and worry more about contracting viruses like HIV. But syphilis is back locally, and in a big way.  

Strange Days in the 2nd District

Lies, 'blood money' and history all part of lawsuit

1 Comment · Wednesday, June 23, 2010
The congresswoman for Ohio's 2nd District last week filed a defamation lawsuit against one of her opponents from the 2008 election. The suit by Rep. Jean Schmidt (R-Miami Township) alleges that David Krikorian of Madeira and his campaign made a number of knowingly false and derogatory statements about Schmidt during and after the election. And from there, things get a little weird.  

Opening Doors and Minds

Groups pool efforts to help ex-offenders find jobs

2 Comments · Wednesday, June 16, 2010
At 23 years old, James Lunsford might have been out of options. Just a few years out of high school, the Western Hills resident was working a slew of temporary jobs to make ends meet. But a run-in with the law two years ago — a mistake he regrets and quickly owns — changed everything. With a felony on his record and a suspended driver’s license, he found himself unemployable.  

The Red and Black Adds Some Green

UC earning notice for its sustainability efforts

6 Comments · Tuesday, June 15, 2010
Say "University of Cincinnati" in a crowd of locals, and someone is bound to reply with colors: red and black. But there's a growing push on campus to have people start associating the school with another color: green. UC is one of five Ohio universities (and the only public institution) to earn mention in the recent 'Princeton Review's Guide to 286 Green Colleges.'  

Young Joins City Council in Controversial Deal

Selection process upsets some Dems, sparks call for change

1 Comment · Wednesday, June 9, 2010
Two people that most readers have never heard of before were the deciding factor last week about who became the latest member of Cincinnati City Council, in a process that's left a bad taste in the mouth of many voters. The pair in question was Miles Lindahl and Dawn Jackson — Councilwoman Laketa Cole's chief of staff and council aide, respectively — and when Wendell Young agreed to keep them on, Cole selected him as her replacement.  

New Camp Helps Kids With Mental Health Issues

SummerSmart is the first of its kind in region

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 9, 2010
For most kids summertime means freedom. It's a time of exploration and long days of fun without the rigid structure of the school day. Nothing sums up that childhood rite of passage than time away from home at summer camp, a place where children can make friends and learn new things. But for other kids, a lack of structure, meeting new people and trying new things can be a frightening and scary experience.  

Hotly Contested

Justin Coussoule is making a run for John Boehner's seat in Congress

2 Comments · Thursday, June 3, 2010
At age 35, Justin Coussoule is the Democratic Party's latest shot at capturing the 8th Congressional District seat. An attorney and former Army captain from Liberty Township who works at Procter & Gamble, Coussoule says he entered the race because the economic policies pushed for by U.S. Rep. John Boehner during the past 18 years have caused job losses, declining property values and rising poverty rates in the district.  

3CDC Offers to Move Drop Inn Center

Homeless advocates concerned about accessibility, number of beds

5 Comments · Wednesday, June 2, 2010
Each year thousands of Cincinnati residents wonder where they’re going to sleep each night. Now an offer to restructure and potentially move the city’s largest homeless shelter has many questioning if the offer is sufficient to meet those needs. The Cincinnati Center City Development Corp. (3CDC) recently made an offer to help move the 250-bed Drop Inn Center and build a new shelter at a different location in the city.