WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
Home · Articles · Arts & Culture · Curtain Call · Broadway Across America

Broadway Across America

Theaters, Actors, Etc.

By Rick Pender · March 29th, 2006 · Curtain Call
0 Comments
     
Tags:
  The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee comes to town starting Nov. 14 as part of Broadway Across America's 2006-07 season.
Joan Marcus

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee comes to town starting Nov. 14 as part of Broadway Across America's 2006-07 season.



For CityBeat's annual Best of Cincinnati issue it's the right moment to tell you about BROADWAY ACROSS AMERICA's 2006-2007 offerings at the Aronoff Center. The "best of" theme is apt for the seven-show season announced last week, with only one clunker in the bunch; All Shook Up (Feb. 27-March 11, 2007), using Elvis tunes the way Mamma Mia employs music by ABBA, received indifferent reviews and closed last September. Just about everything else is an award-winning hit, even that old chestnut from the 1950s, Twelve Angry Men (Jan.16-28, 2007), which picked up three Tony nominations last year and became the Roundabout Theatre Company's longest-running drama at its American Airlines Theatre. (My comments from a year ago: www.citybeat. com/2005-02-23/ webonstage5.shtml). The tour features Richard Thomas as the holdout juror who persuades his colleagues to deliberate more carefully. The season opens with The Light in the Piazza (Sept. 5-17), winner of the 2005 Tony. It's a beautiful, old-styled romantic musical with gorgeous melodies by Adam Guettel, grandson of Richard Rodgers -- as in Rodgers & Hammerstein. (I enjoyed it in New York last fall: www.citybeat.com/2005-10-26/webonstage2.shtml.) It's followed by the 2004 Tony winner, Monty Python's Spamalot (Oct. 17-29), a farcical musical "lovingly ripped off" from the British comedy team's film Monty Python and the Holy Grail. My favorite will be The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Nov. 14-26), which I've seen twice (

  The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee comes to town starting Nov.</span></p>

14 as part of Broadway Across America's 2006-07 season.">

Joan Marcus

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee comes to town starting Nov. 14 as part of Broadway Across America's 2006-07 season.


For CityBeat's annual Best of Cincinnati issue it's the right moment to tell you about BROADWAY ACROSS AMERICA's 2006-2007 offerings at the Aronoff Center. The "best of" theme is apt for the seven-show season announced last week, with only one clunker in the bunch; All Shook Up (Feb. 27-March 11, 2007), using Elvis tunes the way Mamma Mia employs music by ABBA, received indifferent reviews and closed last September. Just about everything else is an award-winning hit, even that old chestnut from the 1950s, Twelve Angry Men (Jan.16-28, 2007), which picked up three Tony nominations last year and became the Roundabout Theatre Company's longest-running drama at its American Airlines Theatre. (My comments from a year ago: www.citybeat. com/2005-02-23/ webonstage5.shtml). The tour features Richard Thomas as the holdout juror who persuades his colleagues to deliberate more carefully. The season opens with The Light in the Piazza (Sept. 5-17), winner of the 2005 Tony. It's a beautiful, old-styled romantic musical with gorgeous melodies by Adam Guettel, grandson of Richard Rodgers -- as in Rodgers & Hammerstein. (I enjoyed it in New York last fall: www.citybeat.com/2005-10-26/webonstage2.shtml.) It's followed by the 2004 Tony winner, Monty Python's Spamalot (Oct. 17-29), a farcical musical "lovingly ripped off" from the British comedy team's film Monty Python and the Holy Grail. My favorite will be The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Nov. 14-26), which I've seen twice (www.citybeat.com/ 2005-02-23/webonstage5.shtml). It's a delightful musical about a junior high contest with six kids struggling with growing up. A few audience members are invited onstage during each performance to spell with the cast. I loved it in intimate theater spaces in New York City; how successfully it will translate to the Aronoff's big stage remains to be seen. During the holidays we'll see Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (Dec. 16-28), a musical derived from the 1988 film featuring Michael Caine and Steve Martin as con men on the Riviera. Broadway audiences (it's still running after more than a year) lined up to see John Lithgow and Norbert Leo Butz (who won a 2005 Tony Award); how it plays on tour really depends on casting. The season wraps up next spring with five weeks of Disney's The Lion King (March 29-May 6, 2007). All other shows run for two weeks, but back in 2003 Lion King sold out nine weeks of performances at the Aronoff. (www.citybeat.com/ 2003-04-02/onstage2.shtml). Season tickets ($138-$568) are now on sale: 800-294-1816. ... Speaking of musicals you might enjoy next season, my scouts tell me that UC's COLLEGE-CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC will soon announce its mainstage musicals for 2006-2007 to be Pajama Game (a classic from 1957) and Andrew Lloyd-Webber's Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat; smaller productions in the black-box Cohen Family Studio Theater will be The Robber Bridegroom (a 1976 show based on fairytales), The Full Monty (the 2001 show also gets a production by New Stage Collective in July) and Mark Blitzstein's controversial 1938 show about union recognition, The Cradle Will Rock. ...

In late February C. DEAN TABLER passed away without much notice. The director staged many shows at the Arts Consortium. He was nominated for the best amateur production in the very first iteration of the Cincinnati Entertainment Awards back in 1997 when he staged Marcia Leslie's The Trial of One Short-Sighted Black Woman vs. Mammy Louise and Safreeta Mae. He was a pioneer in local black theater, committed to staging works of high quality and challenging subject matter. Over the years he presented the works by important playwrights such as August Wilson (Fences), Edward Albee (Zoo Story), Charles Fuller (A Soldier's Tale) and Athol Fugard (Sizwe Bansi Is Dead). I especially remember his 1999 production of Cheryl West's Before It Hits Home, about AIDS in the African-American community. Tabler's passing will be marked with a memorial by the Cincinnati Black Theatre Company.

 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close