WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
Home · Articles · Music · Locals Only · Locals Only: : the quick and the dead-on

Locals Only: : the quick and the dead-on

Paperback's first full-length album provides tight, diverse Rock & Roll for an ADD world

By Katherine L. Sontag · December 8th, 2004 · Locals Only
0 Comments
     
Tags:
Paperback
Katherine Sontag

Paperback



Q: How many ADD kids does it take to screw in a light bulb?

A: Let's go ride bikes!

After 10 minutes with Paperback the ADD joke above has new meaning.

Images of a box of Marlboro's, three drinking-straw catapults, a paper napkin attempt at origami and countless off-the-subject interjections (like whether Spiderman or Superman superhero underpants were cooler) dominate my recollections of the interview. So nothing else for the title of their first full-length album, Let's Go Ride Bikes, could be more perfect.

"We really try to keep our songs short and to the point," says Tom Willis, lead guitarist and vocalist. "The ADD joke frames up who Paperback is nicely."

Well put. The entire album clocks in at barely 40 minutes, and no song goes far over three minutes.

"Plus, the majority of the members are severely afflicted with ADD," jokes drummer Josh Craig, as he avoids bassist David Rockel's ongoing straw catapult attack of wet napkin bits.

Don't be fooled -- there's something to be said for songs neatly packaged for vending machine efficiency, whether it stems from self-diagnosed ADD or sheer got-what-it-takes intelligence.

Rockel, Willis and Craig have spent the last year aggressively carving out a niche for their hard-to-define genre of Rock. When they first started fusing their different influences into one sound, there was a lot of arguing and debating over where to take their music.

"The hardest thing about promotion is selling a sound you, the band, have a hard time describing," says Willis. "The overwhelming amount of Indie-Rock-friendlier venues forced us to work harder for shows."

The mystery behind the music has only brought more interest to Paperback. Their equally indefinable fans have been hungry for the new album, and Let's Go Ride Bikes is mmm-mmm-good instant gratification.

The drive to keep listeners on their toes has produced a one-night stand with multiple partners in sound form. Before you can get tired of one song, Paperback is on to the next.

A quick no-commitment climax, "The Heist," opens the album with short, adrenaline-heavy bursts of NOFX-esque, ditty-Punk bass lines and brash guitar. Craig mediates between the madness and Metal secretly at war in Willis and Rockel's playing. The song stems from a topic, not necessarily related to something personally experienced, according to Rockel.

"Rock has become a platform for teen-angst bands like Linkin Park, which is what we avoid," says Craig.

"Gasoline" breaks down into a hushed fervor highlighting darker lyrics about arson.

"Well, ('Gasoline') isn't an unrelated topic," jests Rockel.

"Speak for yourself. I am no arsonist," clarifies Willis, while Rockel smiles back mockingly, making them seem closer to brothers than bandmates.

Let's Go Ride Bikes has been a patient project that showcases a more mature, comfortable sound with a tight, punchy format that keeps the listener guessing. It's over before you know it and, no, they don't give out Ritalin with purchase.

With the album and last year's goals complete, the band is gingerly looking to the future.

"We don't try to rush into anything," says Craig. "Each year we set modest goals, like producing a full-length album and playing two shows a month."

Playing more out-of-town shows is on next year's list.

"We recently played in this small town where we were treated like old-school Rock stars -- crowd surfing, autograph signings, really wild, really cool," says Willis.

"We were treated bigger than The Beatles," Willis adds. "Cincinnati should do more of that."



PAPERBACK (
Paperback
Katherine Sontag

Paperback



Q: How many ADD kids does it take to screw in a light bulb?

A: Let's go ride bikes!

After 10 minutes with Paperback the ADD joke above has new meaning.

Images of a box of Marlboro's, three drinking-straw catapults, a paper napkin attempt at origami and countless off-the-subject interjections (like whether Spiderman or Superman superhero underpants were cooler) dominate my recollections of the interview. So nothing else for the title of their first full-length album, Let's Go Ride Bikes, could be more perfect.

"We really try to keep our songs short and to the point," says Tom Willis, lead guitarist and vocalist. "The ADD joke frames up who Paperback is nicely."

Well put. The entire album clocks in at barely 40 minutes, and no song goes far over three minutes.

"Plus, the majority of the members are severely afflicted with ADD," jokes drummer Josh Craig, as he avoids bassist David Rockel's ongoing straw catapult attack of wet napkin bits.

Don't be fooled -- there's something to be said for songs neatly packaged for vending machine efficiency, whether it stems from self-diagnosed ADD or sheer got-what-it-takes intelligence.

Rockel, Willis and Craig have spent the last year aggressively carving out a niche for their hard-to-define genre of Rock. When they first started fusing their different influences into one sound, there was a lot of arguing and debating over where to take their music.

"The hardest thing about promotion is selling a sound you, the band, have a hard time describing," says Willis. "The overwhelming amount of Indie-Rock-friendlier venues forced us to work harder for shows."

The mystery behind the music has only brought more interest to Paperback. Their equally indefinable fans have been hungry for the new album, and Let's Go Ride Bikes is mmm-mmm-good instant gratification.

The drive to keep listeners on their toes has produced a one-night stand with multiple partners in sound form. Before you can get tired of one song, Paperback is on to the next.

A quick no-commitment climax, "The Heist," opens the album with short, adrenaline-heavy bursts of NOFX-esque, ditty-Punk bass lines and brash guitar. Craig mediates between the madness and Metal secretly at war in Willis and Rockel's playing. The song stems from a topic, not necessarily related to something personally experienced, according to Rockel.

"Rock has become a platform for teen-angst bands like Linkin Park, which is what we avoid," says Craig.

"Gasoline" breaks down into a hushed fervor highlighting darker lyrics about arson.

"Well, ('Gasoline') isn't an unrelated topic," jests Rockel.

"Speak for yourself. I am no arsonist," clarifies Willis, while Rockel smiles back mockingly, making them seem closer to brothers than bandmates.

Let's Go Ride Bikes has been a patient project that showcases a more mature, comfortable sound with a tight, punchy format that keeps the listener guessing. It's over before you know it and, no, they don't give out Ritalin with purchase.

With the album and last year's goals complete, the band is gingerly looking to the future.

"We don't try to rush into anything," says Craig. "Each year we set modest goals, like producing a full-length album and playing two shows a month."

Playing more out-of-town shows is on next year's list.

"We recently played in this small town where we were treated like old-school Rock stars -- crowd surfing, autograph signings, really wild, really cool," says Willis.

"We were treated bigger than The Beatles," Willis adds. "Cincinnati should do more of that."



PAPERBACK (paperbackmusic.net) hosts a CD release party on Friday at the York Street Café. Super 77, Hilltop Distillery, The Minor Leagues and DJ Empirical also perform.
 
 
 
 

 

comments powered by Disqus
 
Close
Close
Close