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CSO heightened its image around the world

By Rick Pender · December 31st, 2003 · Fine Tuning
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During 2003 the CINCINNATI SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (CSO) expand its positive image with well-reviewed concerts at New York City's Carnegie Hall in late March and additional East Coast cities in early April. In November the CSO toured seven cities in Japan. Music Director Paavo Järvi is cranking up the volume significantly for the 108-year-old symphony, drawing all sorts of accolades. In February 2003, England's Gramophone magazine praised his presence here, saying, "The alliance of one of America's great orchestras with rising conductor Paavo Järvi is no surprise." In March, the CSO announced that Järvi's contract, initially for four years, had been extended to run through the 2008-2009 season. Under his baton, the Telarc label released two CSO recordings in 2003 -- a sparkling set of works by Igor Stravinsky, including Petrouchka and the Firebird Suite in March and, this fall, a passionate rendition of the three suites from Proko-fiev's Roméo et Juliet that captures both the elegance of the dance for which it was written and the drama of the story on which it's based.

The CINCINNATI OPERA had another knock-out season in June and July -- and one that proved that opera can appeal to audiences of all ages. The production of La Traviata sold 98 percent of its seats, and reached the highest number of new opera-goers -- 2,532 people who had never before attended a Cincinnati Opera performance. The season included a thrilling triple-bill production of Poulenc's La Voix Humaine, Weill's The Seven Deadly Sins and the world premiere of William Bolcom's Medusa -- all performed by American soprano Catherine Malfitano.

She handled the diverse program with aplomb and won accolades even from opera fans who prefer more traditional fare.

During 2003 the CINCINNATI SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (CSO) expand its positive image with well-reviewed concerts at New York City's Carnegie Hall in late March and additional East Coast cities in early April. In November the CSO toured seven cities in Japan. Music Director Paavo Järvi is cranking up the volume significantly for the 108-year-old symphony, drawing all sorts of accolades. In February 2003, England's Gramophone magazine praised his presence here, saying, "The alliance of one of America's great orchestras with rising conductor Paavo Järvi is no surprise." In March, the CSO announced that Järvi's contract, initially for four years, had been extended to run through the 2008-2009 season. Under his baton, the Telarc label released two CSO recordings in 2003 -- a sparkling set of works by Igor Stravinsky, including Petrouchka and the Firebird Suite in March and, this fall, a passionate rendition of the three suites from Proko-fiev's Roméo et Juliet that captures both the elegance of the dance for which it was written and the drama of the story on which it's based. ...

The CINCINNATI OPERA had another knock-out season in June and July -- and one that proved that opera can appeal to audiences of all ages. The production of La Traviata sold 98 percent of its seats, and reached the highest number of new opera-goers -- 2,532 people who had never before attended a Cincinnati Opera performance. The season included a thrilling triple-bill production of Poulenc's La Voix Humaine, Weill's The Seven Deadly Sins and the world premiere of William Bolcom's Medusa -- all performed by American soprano Catherine Malfitano. She handled the diverse program with aplomb and won accolades even from opera fans who prefer more traditional fare. The September issue of Opera News identified the company as one of the top 10 opera companies in the U.S. ...

The CINCINNATI BALLET's season included a productive collaboration with BalletMet from Columbus to stage Balanchine's Jewels and another joint endeavor with the Cincinnati Arts Association to present the Paul Taylor Dance Company in November at the Aronoff Center. This would have been covered in more detail in this issue of CityBeat by writer Kathy Valin, but for the fact that she's been hired to cover dance for The Cincinnati Enquirer. The ballet suffered a mystifying loss in September when Executive Director Alan Hills left. Positioned as a resignation, it was clear that Hills, an able administrator who had brought a steady hand to managing the business of the organization, had not been planning to leave. No further explanation has been offered. ...

THE MAY FESTIVAL, the oldest continuous choral festival in the Western Hemisphere, marked its 130th season in May 2003, with concerts of music by Verdi, Mendelssohn, Beethoven, Liszt and an all-Russian program. In 2004, the festival will celebrate Music Director James Conlon's 25th season of leadership. ...

KEITH LOCKHART, now nationally know as the director of the Boston Pops, came back to town in January for a sold-out gig with his old musical colleagues at the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra, where he was music director from 1990-1995.

 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
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