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Oct. 18 Free Night of Theater is already sold out

Theaters, Actors, Etc.

By Rick Pender · October 15th, 2007 · Curtain Call
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  Nicole Tuthill and Ryan Gilreath star in New Edgecliff Theatre's Fat Pig.
Michael Shooner

Nicole Tuthill and Ryan Gilreath star in New Edgecliff Theatre's Fat Pig.



The League of Cincinnati Theatre's local promotion of a FREE NIGHT OF THEATER, first written about locally in this column a year ago, is a hands-down success. Part of a national program started in 2005 by Theatre Communications Group in three cities, the night has now spread to more than 50 cities across the country. On Oct. 1 at 10 a.m., approximately 500 tickets were made available to performances for Oct. 18 at seven area theaters: Cincinnati Playhouse (Altar Boyz), Cincinnati Shakespeare Company (Cymbeline), Ensemble Theatre of Cincinnati (More Fun Than Bowling), Know Theatre of Cincinnati (The Pillowman), New Edgecliff Theatre (Fat Pig), Falcon Theatre (The Diary of Anne Frank) and Covedale Center for the Performing Arts (Over the Tavern). They were snatched up by 11 a.m. ETC offered 30 seats for More Fun Than Bowling, which were gone in five minutes; another 44 were added, all claimed by 11 a.m. (If you'd like to check out the national dimension of this event, go to www.freenightoftheater.net.) Think about it: When that Thursday rolls around, more than 500 people will experience Cincinnati's excellent local theater scene -- a lot of them who probably haven't seen a show at that theater before. That's what I call good news.

"National Coming Out Day" is Thursday, and Know Theatre of Cincinnati is marking the event with two 8 p.m. presentations (Wednesday at Know's Jackson St. Underground and Thursday at Below Zero, 1122 Walnut St.).

For the fourth year the Over-the-Rhine theater is offering OUT!

The League of Cincinnati Theatre's local promotion of a FREE NIGHT OF THEATER, first written about locally in this column a year ago, is a hands-down success. Part of a national program started in 2005 by Theatre Communications Group in three cities, the night has now spread to more than 50 cities across the country. On Oct. 1 at 10 a.m., approximately 500 tickets were made available to performances for Oct. 18 at seven area theaters: Cincinnati Playhouse (Altar Boyz), Cincinnati Shakespeare Company (Cymbeline), Ensemble Theatre of Cincinnati (More Fun Than Bowling), Know Theatre of Cincinnati (The Pillowman), New Edgecliff Theatre (Fat Pig), Falcon Theatre (The Diary of Anne Frank) and Covedale Center for the Performing Arts (Over the Tavern). They were snatched up by 11 a.m. ETC offered 30 seats for More Fun Than Bowling, which were gone in five minutes; another 44 were added, all claimed by 11 a.m. (If you'd like to check out the national dimension of this event, go to www.freenightoftheater.net.) Think about it: When that Thursday rolls around, more than 500 people will experience Cincinnati's excellent local theater scene -- a lot of them who probably haven't seen a show at that theater before. That's what I call good news. ...

"National Coming Out Day" is Thursday, and Know Theatre of Cincinnati is marking the event with two 8 p.m. presentations (Wednesday at Know's Jackson St. Underground and Thursday at Below Zero, 1122 Walnut St.). For the fourth year the Over-the-Rhine theater is offering OUT! TRUE COMING OUT EXPERIENCES. They will enact stories submitted by local residents about their experiences via anecdotes, essays, recollections, memories, poems and so on about people who are gay, lesbian, transsexual and transgendered. Info: www.knowtheatre.com ...

On Tuesday at 7:30 p.m., Cincinnati Playwrights Initiative and the Cincinnati Arts Association present a staged reading in its New Voices Series, MORNING VIEW by Denise Stoner-Barone. The script is a story of four sisters, including one absent for a decade, who come together for a final viewing of their mother. Tom Fox directs the reading at the Fifth Third Bank Theater at the Aronoff Center.

MINIREVIEWS
OTHELLO is Shakespeare's most inward-looking, intimate play, unique for its narrow view. No kings. No armies. No battles, only five major characters. It's a perfect choice for the Cincinnati Playhouse's Shelterhouse, where Ed Stern has staged it -- the first Shakespearean script on that stage in 38 years. Othello, a noble general, loves his beautiful wife Desdemona past reason, and she loves him. Iago, passed over for promotion, hates Othello and plants seeds of doubt about Desdemona's virtue. As the villain, R. Ward Duffy magnetically embodies one of Shakespeare's most tantalizing characters -- filling the stage with sibilant, manipulative rage but making no attempt to explain something the playwright left inexplicable. Is Iago powered by a sincere thirst for revenge? Or simply a sociopath in search of a thrill? (Tom McElfresh) Grade: A

In FAT PIG, Tom, a handsome young man is attracted to an overweight woman. Neil LaBute's scripts and screenplays often revel in bad behavior by misogynists, but as staged through Oct. 20 by New Edgecliff Theatre (NET), Fat Pig is complicated. Tom is harassed by two co-workers, especially a woman he's dated casually. They stir his pot of self-doubt. Tom is a weak-willed wimp who struggles to overcome the peer pressure. We jump from attraction to infatuation to anxiety and spineless rejection without enough connective motivation to understand Tom's evolution. NET likes to make risky choices with scripts, and this one had audience members gasping at remarks made by its characters. But this production only occasionally delivers LaBute's vicious vitality. (Rick Pender) Grade: C+



contact rick Pender: rpender(at)citybeat.com
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
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