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The Section Quartet: Fuzzbox (Decca)

CD Review

By Justine Reisinger · August 22nd, 2007 · Short Takes
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  THE SECTION QUARTET -- FUZZBOX
THE SECTION QUARTET -- FUZZBOX



The Section Quartet's Fuzzbox comes with advice: "TSQ recommends playing this album at an inappropriately LOUD volume because rock and roll sounds better that way." This comment aptly represents the album as a whole: an attempt at Rock & Roll that tries too hard to prove that it really rocks.

I shouldn't need to be told to crank up the volume. I should be cranking it up myself as the first notes seep out the speakers of my car with the windows rolled down. And while listening to this album, at some points I did. The Section Quartet is a Los Angeles-based string section comprised of two violins, a viola and cello. While the group collaborates with many different artists on and off stage (from David Bowie to Christina Augilera), it deserves recognition for its inspired takes on various Rock songs. Best known for self-arranged renditions of OK Computer and Dark Side of the Moon, this album showcases a wider range of covers ­ too wide for me, in fact. I prefer my Led Zeppelin covers seporate from The Strokes ones. Produced by Linda Perry (and Jon Brion on Yeah Yeah Yeah's cover "Phenomena"), the album certainly hits the target on many of the covers. "Black Hole Sun" is incredibly epic and wonderful, while the string instruments successfully pin down the emotions found in songs like Postal Service's "Such Great Heights" and Bowie's "The Man Who Sold the World," even though the lyrics are missing. A true feat in itself. (JR) Grade: B

 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
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