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City Plans to Add More Cops

By German Lopez · February 5th, 2014 · City Desk
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City officials on Feb. 3 announced a new public safety initiative that promises to put more cops on the streets, focus on “hot spots” of crime, restart the gang unit and do more to reach out to youth. 

The comprehensive plan comes after a rough start to the year, with homicides and violent crime ticking up even as the weather remains cold. 

Among other initiatives, the plan will add more cops on the ground through new hires, more overtime and a new recruit class — the first since 2008. 

The plan will come at higher costs to an already-strained operating budget. Mayor John Cranley said the Cincinnati Police Department set aside nearly $1 million for the proposal through June, while the remaining $5.6 million should be funded in the city’s $370-plus million operating budget. 

When asked whether initiatives like the one announced on Feb.

3 will hurt the budget, Cranley reiterated his long-standing position that public safety takes top priority in the city budget. 

Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell said the refocus intends to prevent, not just solve, crimes. He acknowledged more cops alone won’t end the city’s crime problem, but he argued increasing the level of evidence-based enforcement — through new tactics supported by more cops on the streets — could make a difference. 

Cranley and Blackwell cautioned the results might not be immediate, but they said it’s an important step to stop levels of crime local residents are clearly unhappy with. 

Hot spot policing carries a high level of empirical support. In two different studies from Rutgers and the Ministry of Justice in the Netherlands, researchers argued the strategy doesn’t always displace crime; it can also prevent crime by deterring and discouraging future incidents in hot spots and surrounding areas — what researchers call a “diffusion” of benefits.

But the concept also needs to be executed carefully. In New York City, “stop and frisk” became a fairly unpopular type of hot spot policing after some reports found the strategy targeted racial makeups in neighborhoods more than levels of crime.

Of course, better policing isn’t the only way to combat crime. As two examples, lead abatement and ending the war on drugs could prevent violence by reducing aggression and eliminating a huge source of income for drug cartels. 

 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
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