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Defriending COAST

Local politicians distance themselves from COAST’s bigoted history and hypocritical tactics

By German Lopez · October 16th, 2013 · News
news1_cranleycoast_juliehillIllustration: Julie Hill

Mayoral candidate John Cranley says he would reject an endorsement from the Coalition Opposed to Additional Spending and Taxes (COAST), a conservative group formed in 1999 with a history of anti-LGBT causes.

“I don’t want it. I’m not a member of COAST,” says Cranley, who’s running against fellow Democrat and Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls in the Nov. 5 election.

The response came just two days after COAST on Oct. 8 tweeted that it supported Cranley and council candidates Amy Murray, Chris Smitherman and Charlie Winburn for a “change of direction.” The group later claimed the tweets weren’t endorsements, but not before progressives called on candidates to reject COAST’s support.

Murray, Smitherman and Winburn didn’t respond to multiple calls and emails from CityBeat asking whether they would accept COAST’s support for their campaigns. Smitherman, who is president of the local branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) when he’s not running for office, often teams up with COAST on local issues.

Councilman Chris Seelbach, who has been a favorite target of COAST, tells CityBeat there’s no doubt the group’s vitriolic opposition to his re-election is at least partly based on homophobia.

“Without question, I believe COAST targets me because I’m gay,” Seelbach says. “In some ways, I’m a symbol of everything that they hate, which is LGBT progress.”

Cranley agrees the group is bigoted. He points out that some COAST members have criticized him over the years for supporting LGBT causes, including hate crime legislation in 2003.

In the 1990s, Chris Finney, chief legal crusader for COAST, authored Article XII, the city charter amendment approved by voters in 1993 that barred the city from deeming gays a protected class in anti-discrimination statutes. 

In a June 1994 Cincinnati Post article, Finney said landlords should not be legally required to rent to gay or lesbian tenants.

Finney explained, “Because there may be some who don’t want their family dining next to a homosexual couple whose actions they find offensive.” Critics have compared his position to arguments leveled in support of racial segregation in the 1960s.

COAST chairman Tom Brinkman and member Mark Miller were also part of Equal Rights Not Special Rights, which defended Article XII in court in 1997. 

When City Council passed hate crime legislation protecting gays and lesbians in 2003, Brinkman criticized the Catholic members of City Council at the time — including Cranley, who sponsored the legislation — for sending “the message that you openly approve of homosexuality.”

Back then, Cranley responded, “We have a little something in this country called the separation of church and state. Mr. Brinkman asked me to read the Catechism. I ask him to read the U.S. Constitution.”

Around the same time, Seelbach prepared and then helped lead the 2004 campaign that did away with Article XII. For Cincinnati, the repeal of the city charter amendment exemplified the more tolerant, open direction the country was moving in regards to the LGBT community.

But while the country has embraced greater equality for LGBT individuals, Seelbach says COAST hasn’t done the same. Even though Seelbach voted against the parking plan that COAST also opposes, the conservative organization has regularly targeted Seelbach in blog posts and emails criticizing the plan, which leases the city’s parking meters, lots and garages to the local Port Authority.

In March, COAST sent out a doctored image that compared Seelbach to Judas Iscariot, who betrayed Jesus Christ in the Christian religion, for approving an emergency clause on the parking plan that effectively exempted the plan from a voter referendum. Seelbach voted against the parking plan itself when it came to a vote.

“I don’t believe in running our city by referendums,” Seelbach says. “What we currently have is a representative democracy. We elect people that we hold accountable by either re-electing them or not, and we trust the people that we elect to research the policies and make informed decisions. I think that’s the best system.”

Most recently, COAST went after Seelbach for his trip to Washington, D.C., where he received the Harvey Milk Champion of Change award for his efforts to protect and promote Cincinnati’s LGBT community. The city paid more than $1,200 for the trip, which COAST called into question with legal threats. Even though City Solicitor John Curp, the city’s top lawyer, deemed the allegations frivolous, Seelbach agreed to personally reimburse the funds to stave off a lawsuit that could have cost the city more than $30,000.

At the same time, media outlets, including WCPO and The Cincinnati Enquirer, have closely covered COAST’s allegations and commonly turn to the group to get the conservative side of different issues, ranging from the streetcar project to the pension system. Both media outlets have characterized COAST as a “government watchdog group,” ignoring the organization’s history of conservative activism and crafting legislation.

The favorable attention might be turning around. The Enquirer recently scrutinized COAST’s lawsuits against the city, which revealed the group, which frames itself as an anti-tax, anti-spending watchdog, could cost the city more than $500,000 in legal fees. The city solicitor also estimated his office puts the equivalent of one full-time employee on COAST’s cases, with the typical city civil attorney making about $65,000 a year, according to The Enquirer.

Seelbach acknowledges the vast differences between the black and LGBT civil rights movements, but he says a group with a similarly discriminatory past wouldn’t get the kind of media coverage and attention COAST does, at least without the proper context.

“If there was a group that had a history of fighting for segregation … there is absolutely no way anyone, much less media, would quote or accept support in any form,” he says. ©

 
 
 
 

 

 
10.27.2013 at 01:00 Reply

If COAST is a watchdog, then the City of Cincinnati is one big fire hydrant.

 

 
 
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