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City Tackles Cellphone Theft

By German Lopez · September 11th, 2013 · City Desk
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In partnership with the Cincinnati Police Department, City Councilman Chris Seelbach on Sept. 5 unveiled a legislative plan that would crack down on cellphone thefts by making it more difficult to sell stolen devices.

“We know that the cellphone is such an important part of everyone’s lives,” Seelbach says. “It’s how we connect to our loved ones, to our work environment. It’s how we capture moments that we want to remember. And so to have something like that stolen is definitely an offense that is personal.”

Cellphone thefts made up 30 to 40 percent of robberies in major cities in 2011, according to the Federal Communications Commission.

The initiative will require the hundreds of dealers who currently buy cellphones second-hand to get licensed with the city and keep full records of the transaction, including a serial number of the device, a photocopy of the seller’s ID and other contact information.

Seelbach likened the requirements to existing regulations for pawnshops.

The hope is that cracking down on dealers will make stolen cellphones more difficult to sell and less lucrative to potential thieves.

Seelbach says the plan will come at no extra cost outside of the extra policing work. Acting Cincinnati Police Chief Paul Humphries says police prefer taking preventive measures that stop cellphone theft in the first place rather than spending costlier resources on investigating a robbery after it happens.

If the legislation is approved by City Council, police officers will first take steps to educate dealers about the new law. Shortly after, police will begin cracking down with fines.

Officials are also advising cellphone owners to take their own steps to avoid having devices stolen: Never leave a phone unattended, avoid using a cellphone in public when it’s unnecessary and put a password lock on the phone.

Similar laws already exist at the state level, but they’re currently not enforced, Seelbach says. The plan was approved by a City Council committee on Sept. 9 and will go to a full session of City Council on Sept. 11. 

 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
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