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Fall Arts Events

Opportunities abound to support and experience the arts around the city (and beyond)

By Staff · August 21st, 2013 · Fall Arts Preview
fallarts-listings_missymazzoli_-credit_stephenstaylorMissy Mazzoli - Photo: Steven S. Taylor
VISUAL ART: LANDSCAPE RE-FRAMED: SCULPTURES BY CELENE HAWKINS

Hawkins, a gifted Cincinnati artist, used as inspiration for her new work the botanical motifs on the gilded frames of the Taft Museum of Art’s landscape paintings, as well as the depicted landscapes on the canvases contained within. So this, then, is a modern interpretation of the masters, and she uses metals, wax, ceramics and mixed media to shake things up. Through Oct. 20. Artist talk: 2 p.m. Sept. 15. Museum admission: $10 adults; $8 seniors, students and teachers; $4 children. Taft Museum of Art, 316 Pike St., Downtown, 513-241-0343, taftmuseum.org. (Steven Rosen)

DANCE: LUNCHBEAT CINCINNATI AT THE CAC 

Does it matter where this hip urban trend of dancing in a museum at lunch started? (It was Stockholm, actually). Learn to let your body speak your mind and be a part of the dance craze sweeping the globe at this monthly lunchtime DJ dance party encouraging people to ditch their desk for an hour and hit the dance floor. Let Pones, Inc., specialists in fusing movement and dance in multiple locations, guide you through your Lunchbeat experience. Noon-1 p.m. Aug. 22. Free. Contemporary Arts Center, 44 E. Sixth St., Downtown, 513-345-8400, contemporaryartscenter.org. (Kathy Valin)

FILM: IN A WORLD

Since appearing in the HBO ensemble dramedy How to Make It in America, Lake Bell has been ready to break out on the big screen. Fortunately, she’s talented enough to step behind the camera in order to control her own destiny. Here, she plays the underachieving daughter of the king of movie trailer voice-overs, who finally accepts the challenge of stepping out of her father’s immense shadow. Seize the crown, Lake! Check out In A World at the FilmDayton Festival. 7 p.m. Aug. 23. $9. The Neon, 130 E. Fifth St., Dayton, filmdayton.com. (tt stern-enzi)

DANCE: DANCE IN THE PARK WITH MAMLUFT&CO.

A late summer chance to strut your dancing self (and bring the whole family along if you wish), where thousands recently frolicked during LumenoCity. An intriguing blend of a professional modern dance company and Sundays in the Park presented by Artswave, Dance in the Park is a blend of classes and family-friendly mini-performances culminating in a collaborative open dance floor. 2-4:30 p.m. Aug. 25. Free. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-494-MLCO, mamluftcodance.org. (KV)

FILM: BIG WORDS

Hip Hop and Rap get real mature as a once-promising group tries to figure out how to adapt to the changing musical landscape while dealing with the usual disappointments and realities of real life versus living the dream. For further grounding, writer-director Neil Drumming sets his debut feature against the backdrop of Obama’s historic 2008 election. The AFFRM (African-American Film Festival Releasing Movement), through its multi-platform distribution label ARRAY, has set up a “touring” expansion model for Big Words’ release (with the FilmDayton screening as a key Midwest visit) that includes international play dates in Sierra Leone and London. 6 p.m. Aug. 25. $9. The Neon, 130 E. Fifth St., Dayton, filmdayton.com. (tts)

VISUAL ART: THE (F)ART SHOW

This one sounds like a gas! Dave Jarred of Golden Brown is curating a Thunder-Sky exhibit that examines the relationship of flatulence to aesthetics. On the blog of Keith Banner, Thunder-Sky’s co-founder, Jarred describes the purpose: “Farts are a part of our humanity — funny, painful, secret and proud parts of being a person. The fart is also a great metaphor for the conceptual side of art making. Like creating a piece of art, a fart starts out as something personal and invisible inside of the artist…” Will they serve beans on opening night? Aug. 30-Oct. 12. Free. Thunder-Sky, Inc., 4573 Hamilton Ave., Northside, 513-823-8914, raymondthundersky.org. (SR)

VISUAL ART: WATERCOLORS BY ED KITCHEN

This watercolorist from Lancaster, Ohio — who happens to be brother-in-law of RBds Gallery owner Richard Butz — gets a chance to show off his way with lively colors on subjects like an abstracted, slightly Cubist but still recognizable vase of flowers. The commercial gallery is a new and much-needed addition to Over-the-Rhine. Aug. 31 to still-undetermined date. Free. RBds Gallery, 1425 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-378-0618. (SR)

VISUAL ART: MARTIN TUCKER: REMEMBERED

The DAAP Galleries at UC are mounting this retrospective to Tucker, a retired professor of art and painter who died earlier this year. In his colorfully abstracted work, he focuses on depictions of recognizable ordinary and even mundane objects — he found visual stimulation in shopping malls, supermarkets as well as home and school. Sept. 3-Oct. 13. Free. College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning, University of Cincinnati, 2624 Clifton Ave., Clifton, 513-556-2839, daap.uc.edu/galleries. (SR)

ONSTAGE: OTHER DESERT CITIES

A one-hit novelist comes home for the holidays, ready to publish a juicy memoir about some long-kept family secrets around her brother’s suicide. She’s gotten liberal; her parents hang out with conservatives. Turmoil ensues. John Robin Baitz’s play was a Tony Award nominee and a finalist for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for drama. Sept. 4-22. $39-$43. Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati, 1127 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-421-3555, ensemblecincinnati.org. (Rick Pender)

FILM: JODOROWSKY’S DUNE 

Fans of Frank Herbert’s Dune saga are legion and have eagerly awaited a filmed treatment of the series that would do it justice. This Toronto International Film Festival (Sept. 5-15) selection from director Frank Pavich (who produced the adaptation Anton Chekhov’s The Duel) may not reach area theaters, but it lands as a must-see. It follows the idea of what Alejandro Jodorowsky’s never-made Dune adaptation would look like. Let the great ‘what if’ games begin. Jodorowsky’s varied career includes studying mime with Marcel Marceau in Paris, directing avant-garde theater in Paris and Mexico City, and venturing into surrealist film. His adaptation was to star the likes of Orson Welles and Salvador Dali with a score by Pink Floyd. tiff.net. (tts)

FILM: ALL IS BY MY SIDE 

Writer-director John Ridley (screenwriting credits include Undercover Brother, Three Kings and Red Tails) teams up with André Benjamin (André 3000 of Outkast fame) for this passion project, a biopic on legendary guitarist Jimi Hendrix. As is the case with most musical subjects, securing the rights to songs was next to impossible, so story and music will focus on Hendrix’s days as a struggling artist prior to the release of Are You Experienced?.

Benjamin channels the Hendrix vibe, but will we experience the man behind the haze? Screens at the Toronto International Film Festival. Sept. 5-15. $23.50. tiff.net. (tts)

ONSTAGE: OLIVER TWIST

Charles Dickens published his novel about the harrowing adventures of the orphan Oliver Twist in 1838, so it’s a familiar tale. But this stage adaptation is brand new, recreating the sights, sounds, songs and spirit of Victorian London. Cincy Shakes gives Neil Bartlett’s script its regional premiere. Sept. 6-29. $22-$35. Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, 719 Race St., Downtown, 513-381-2273, cincyshakes.com. (RP)

VISUAL ART: PETER HALLEY: PRINTS & EDITIONS – 25 YEARS

Carl Solway Gallery, our premier commercial gallery, again snags an important show by a major contemporary artist with this extensive look at Peter Halley’s prints and limited editions. For more than 25 years, this New York artist has been making conceptual-based and brilliantly colored geometric abstract art. His theory, according to his website, is to create interplay between “‘prisons’ and ‘cells’ — icons that reflect the increasing geometricization of social space in the world in which we live.” Sept. 6-Dec. 21. Free. Carl Solway Gallery, 424 Findlay St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-621-0069, solwaygallery.com. (SR)

ONSTAGE: FLY

You might know the story of the famed Tuskegee Airmen from World War II, but I bet you’ve never heard it told with video projections and tap dancing. Their courage gave them a place in history that you’ll remember from this show. Sept. 12-Oct. 5. $30-$75. Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mount Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888, cincyplay.com. (RP)

VISUAL ART: MATTHEW FLEGLE: NO SHELTER

The Weston Gallery, the nonprofit space in the Aronoff Center for the Arts, starts its 2013-2014 season with a show by Columbus artist Flegle, who repurposes building materials like drywall, plaster, wall studs and concrete to create sculpture that suggests architectural purpose but stands independently as art. The artist sees his work as commenting on the human condition. The show will have three recent pieces by him. Sept. 20-Dec. 1. Free. Alice F. and Harris K. Weston Gallery, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, 513-977-4165, westonartgallery.com. (SR)

FILM: DON JON

Joseph Gordon-Levitt has enjoyed a steady rise in the game, capping things off with his Christopher Nolan two-for (Inception and The Dark Knight Rises), but he’s likely hoping that Don Jon, his first major effort that finds him splitting time both in front of the camera and behind it (as writer and director), will catapult him to the upper echelon. As a bridge and tunnel Don Juan, Gordon-Levitt brings attitude and a willingness to bare his soul (and a whole lot more) in order to become a better man and lover. Opens Sept. 27. (tts)

CLASSICAL MUSIC: HARMONIC BRASS AND CONCERT:NOVA

Munich’s Harmonic Brass quintet is a perfect match for concert:nova’s brass members. HB’s repertoire ranges from Bach to Billy Joel and beyond. Both ensembles perform separately and join forces for two large works that will surely shake the rafters. 7:30 p.m. Oct. 2. Old St. Mary’s Church, 123 E. 13th St., Over-the-Rhine, concertnova.com. (Anne Arenstein)

ONSTAGE: SEVEN SPOTS ON THE SUN

Set in a Latin American village devastated by a civil war, this world premiere by Martin Zimmerman is about many forms of survival — emotional, medical and spiritual . Oct. 3-27. $30-$75. Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mount Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888, cincyplay.com. (RP)

VISUAL ART: CONCERNED PHOTOGRAPHY

Kennedy Heights Arts Center, which has developed a nice reputation for its photography shows, presents this new one devoted to the work of local photographers who attempt in their work to show and share concern for society’s struggling, disenfranchised members. You’ll find such work as “Guardian Angels” by photojournalist Melvin Grier, who had a sterling retrospective at the center a while back. He conceived this show with Jymi Bolden and Michael Kearns. Oct. 5-Nov.16. Free. Kennedy Heights Arts Center, 6546 Montgomery Road, Kennedy Heights, 513-631-4278, kennedyarts.org. (SR)

ONSTAGE: RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN

You know that old adage about greener grass on the other side of the fence? That’s the theme of Gina Gionfriddo’s new play about a rock-star academic and her best friend, a mom and housewife. When they intersect, it turns into a dangerous game of musical chairs that results in insights and humor. The play was a 2013 Pulitzer Prize finalist. Oct. 9-27. $39-$43. Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati, 1127 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-421-3555, ensemblecincinnati.org. (RP)

ONSTAGE: CABARET

You don’t want to be sitting at home alone in your room when Kander and Ebb’s great musical Cabaret takes the stage at the Playhouse. This one was a Broadway hit a half-century ago, and its songs and dancing still make for a gripping tale set in a decadent nightclub in pre-war Berlin where everyone is “Wilkommen.” Oct. 19-Nov.16. $30-$75. Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mount Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888, cincyplay.com. (RP)

CLASSICAL MUSIC: PIANIST STEWART GOODYEAR

This should be classified as an “event” because Stewart Goodyear is a piano phenom, performing the complete Beethoven sonatas in one day, among other accomplishments. He’s appeared with the CSO and this is a rare opportunity to hear him as soloist. His Constella Festival program isn’t as strenuous as the Beethoven gig, but it’s a stunner: Berg’s Piano Sonata, Bach’s French Suite No. 5 in G Major and Beethoven’s Diabelli Variations. 8 p.m. Oct. 19. $24.50-$75. Memorial Hall, 1225 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, constellafestival.org. (AA)

FILM: OLDBOY

Spike Lee seems to be taking a page from Martin Scorsese’s playbook with Oldboy, an adaptation of Chan-wook Park’s mysterious thriller from 2003 about a kidnapping victim who has been imprisoned for 15 years. Upon his release, the man has five days to find his captor. In Lee’s remake, Josh Brolin plays the man in question and with a cast including Elizabeth Olsen, Samuel L. Jackson and Sharlto Copley, expect all of the menace and mayhem from the original and then some. Opens Oct. 25. (tts)

VOCAL ARTS: EXHILARATING ARIAS

Soprano Jessica Rivera and mezzo Kelley O’Connor are two of America’s hottest young singers. Their recent appearances in Cincinnati Opera productions garnered raves and this joint concert promises to be memorable, especially since their accompanist is Robert Spano, conductor of the Atlanta Symphony and a frequent collaborator with both artists. The program includes newly commissioned song cycles by David Bruce and Jonathan Leshnoff as well as classic solos and duets. 8 p.m. Oct. 26. $24.50-$75. Memorial Hall, 1225 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, constellafestival.org. (AA)

ONSTAGE: SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN

Gene Kelly won’t be at the College-Conservatory of Music this fall, but his joyous, graceful spirit will surely prevail as the great 1952 movie musical is recreated onstage at the University of Cincinnati. Choreographer Diane Lala is staging the show, partnering with another fine dance master, Patti James, to put CCM’s talented performers through their paces. Only five performances, so don’t blink. Oct. 31-Nov. 3. $18-$35. Corbett Auditorium, CCM, University of Cincinnati, Jefferson Avenue and Corry Boulevard, Clifton Heights, 513-556-4183, ccm.uc.edu. (RP)

DANCE: CONTEMPORARY DANCE THEATER PRESENTS DOUG VARONE AND DANCERS

Dance lovers, take special note. This longtime modern dance presenter opens its season with the world-famous Doug Varone, an exceptionally fluent dancemaker and his company of superb dancers. Witness kinetically thrilling dances that explore the complexity of the human spirit from the smallest gestures to full-throttle bursts of movement, guaranteed to take your breath away. This is a don’t-miss-dance. 8:30 p.m. Nov 1-2. $22-$32. Aronoff Center for the Arts, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, 513-621-ARTS, cdt-dance.org. (KV)

ONSTAGE: BULL

A production of Mike Bartlett’s Cock, a tale of jealousy and sexual rivalry was a big hit for the Know Theatre in the spring, so it makes sense that a companion script by Bartlett should show up this fall. Bull portrays a different kind of intense rivalry: office politics and the dirty business of survival of the fittest — or the meanest. Nov. 1-30. $15-$18. Know Theatre of Cincinnati, 1120 Jackson St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-300-5669, knowtheatre.com. (RP)

DANCE: DEAD CAN DANCE

Come dressed as your worst nightmare for an experience that will haunt you! Once again, the world-class locally based Exhale Dance Tribe will present their second Halloween dance event in Cincinnati. The signature flair of Broadway veterans Missy Lay Zimmer and Andrew Hubbard and the talents of local actress Jodie Linver combine in a terrifying yet strangely funny vision of the spirits that haunt pumpkin time. Drinks and complimentary hors d’oeuvres before the show. 8:30 p.m. Nov. 1. $30. Memorial Hall, 1225 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, exhaledancetribe.com. (KV)

VOCAL ARTS: L’AMORE DEI TRE RE

Italo Montemezzi’s opera is a cult classic, rarely performed and beloved by those who treasure its unique music. The composer conducted it during Cincinnati Opera’s glory days at the Cincinnati Zoo. As the title implies, three kings are in love with one woman, which means there’s no happy ending. The Queen City Chamber Opera, headed by artistic director Isaac Selya, presents this operatic rarity featuring tenor Marco Panuccio and soprano Meghan Tarkington. 8 p.m. Nov. 2  and 2 p.m. Nov. 3. $18-$26. Arts Center at Dunham Theater, 1945 Dunham Way, West Price Hill, facebook.com/queencitychamberopera. (AA)

VOCAL ARTS: MUSE WITH MELANIE DEMORE

Nationally acclaimed ensemble MUSE, Cincinnati’s Women’s Choir, makes its first appearance under the direction of new artistic director Rhonda Juliano. Composer, performer and poet Melanie DeMore, who mesmerized past audiences with her velvety contralto, returns for a program of spirituals, original compositions and community singing. Nov. 15-17. $20 (sliding scale). St. John’s Unitarian Church, 320 Resor Ave., Clifton, musechoir.org. (AA)

CLASSICAL MUSIC: VOCAL ARTS ENSEMBLE

Cincinnati’s premier vocal ensemble is at the top of its game as it takes on two masterpieces composed two centuries apart: Mozart’s sublime Great Mass in C minor and Arvo Pärt’s Te Deum. Accompanied by the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra, the concert takes place in what may be one of the best choral acoustic settings in town. 4 p.m. Nov. 17. $10-$25. St. Catherine of Siena Church, 2848 Fischer Place, Westwood, ccocincinnati.org. (AA)

VISUAL ART: MANIFEST GALLERY EXPANSION

For its 10th anniversary, East Walnut Hills’ Manifest Gallery is considerably expanding its space to include two new galleries — Center and North — that will allow the nonprofit organization to offer more and bigger shows. It expects to celebrate the project’s completion in early November with a five-gallery exhibit of contemporary art. The new space, in the same building, will double Manifest’s storefront presence on Woodburn Avenue, thus benefiting the slow but steady revival of that neighborhood business district. Manifest Creative Research Gallery, 2727 Woodburn Ave., Walnut Hills, 513-861-3638, manifestgallery.org. (Steven Rosen)

CLASSICAL MUSIC: MISSY MAZZOLI

The Constella Festival got it right when they named Missy Mazzoli as artist-in-residence. One of the most original and exciting composers today, her works are performed by major orchestras and ensembles including eighth blackbird and the Kronos Quartet. Mazzoli leads a concert of recent compositions including the 2009 “Harp and Altar for string quartet and electronics” and excerpts from the 2012 “Songs from an Uproar” for mezzo, flute, piano, electric guitar, bass and clarinet. 7:30 p.m. Oct. 15. $25. Griffin Hall Digitorium, Northern Kentucky University, 1 Nunn Drive, Highland Heights, constellafestival.org. (Anne Arenstein)

DANCE: STAGED ON CENTRAL & RACE

Elementz is an inspiring youth center in Over-the-Rhine’s Gateway Quarter — located directly across the street from the School for Creative and Performing Arts — where inner-city youth are the stars of a signature monthly urban arts showcase of spoken word, Hip-Hop, R&B and dance. This installment of Staged on Central & Race features West African music and dance by special guest Bi-Okoto. All ages. Sept. 19 and every third Thursday. $5. Elementz Urban Arts Center, 1100 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-721-5800, elementz.org. (Kathy Valin)


 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
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