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Trixie Whitley

Feb. 10 • Molly Malone's Covington

By Brian Baker · February 4th, 2013 · Sound Advice
soundadvice_trixie_whitley_photo_guy_kokkenPhoto: Guy Kokken
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Trixie Whitley was destined for a creative life. She's the daughter of acclaimed Blues/Folk singer/songwriter Chris Whitley (if you don’t know his work, make your life better by seeking out everything he ever did) and his Belgian wife Helene Gavaert, whose Gypsy lineage brims with painters, sculptors and musicians. Whitley was introduced to performing early on. At age 3, her father brought her onstage and she sang backing vocals on his Terra Incognito album at 9. 

After her parents divorced, Whitley and her mother relocated to Belgium where she threw herself into artistic pursuits as a drummer, singer and actor.

At 11, she served as a DJ for the Belgium Museum of Modern Art; she stood on beer crates to reach the turntables.

At 17, just before her father succumbed to lung cancer, Whitley left school and moved to New York, learning guitar and piano and playing small solo gigs while working in a restaurant. At 21, she recorded her debut EP, the aptly titled Strong Blood, and passed a copy to super-producer Daniel Lanois at a Belgian music festival. Lanois, who had worked with her father, invited Whitley to participate in a recording project that became the quasi-supergroup Black Dub, which she fronted for nearly two years. 

After two more EPs — 2009’s The Engine and 2011’s Live at the Rockwood Music Hall — Whitley began working on her just-released full-length debut, Fourth Corner. Her smoky and supple voice is reminiscent of her father and her songwriting is clearly marked by his passion and power, but Trixie Whitley’s music is influenced by her unique and impossibly diverse experience as much as her richly creative DNA.


TRIXIE WHITLEY performs with Dumpster Hunter Sunday, Feb. 10 at Molly Malone's in Covington.

 
 
 
 

 

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