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COAST's Latest Anti-Streetcar Rant is Flimsier than Normal

By German Lopez · August 15th, 2012 · News
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The Coalition Opposed to Additional Spending and Taxes (COAST) has long been known locally for its unwavering opposition to the streetcar project, but the organization crossed the line into dishonesty on Aug. 6 with its calls to action about the sale of the Blue Ash Airport. 

In short, a statement released by COAST claimed that Cincinnati is trying to force Blue Ash into rescinding the sale of the Blue Ash Airport so a new deal can be worked that will funnel the sale money into the streetcar.

The real story behind the sale of the Blue Ash Airport is not as scandalous as COAST portrays. Some background: In 2006, the city of Blue Ash agreed to a deal with the city of Cincinnati to buy out 130 of 228 acres owned by Cincinnati at the Blue Ash Airport. Blue Ash would pay Cincinnati $37.5 million over 30 years, Cincinnati would move the airport to the adjacent 98 acres and Blue Ash would build a central park on the 130 acres.

Blue Ash voters in a two-to-one margin approved the deal with a related 0.25 percent earnings tax to fund the new park.

Unfortunately, things didn’t go exactly as planned. As part of the deal, Cincinnati had to apply for a $10 million grant from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The expectation was that Cincinnati would get this grant, making the cost of moving and maintaining the airport sustainable. But Cincinnati did not get that grant, and it has since decided to close the airport to save money.

This is where it gets tricky. Under federal law, since the land was sold as an airport, the money gained from the sale must be used on airports. That severely limits how Cincinnati can use the sale money.

What Cincinnati wants to do is have Blue Ash rescind the original sale and then officially close down the airport before re-selling the land to Blue Ash.

This would let Cincinnati sell the land when it’s not classified as an airport, which would let Cincinnati use the $37.5 million in sale money on non-airport projects. Cincinnati has said $11 million of that freed-up money would go to the streetcar, and $26 million would go to municipal projects.

Everyone wins here. Cincinnati shuts down an airport that is no longer affordable, money is freed up for other projects and Blue Ash is a good neighbor and doesn’t lose anything. It still gets the park its voters want and pays the same amount for the property.

Well, not according to COAST. Even though less than one-third of the money is going to the streetcar, COAST insists Blue Ash is getting screwed in the deal so Cincinnati can fund the streetcar. The organization claims the new deal will result in “Blue Ash’s pockets” being “picked” for streetcar funds.

But Blue Ash is not paying for the streetcar. It is paying for the 130 acres of land to build a park. It has been paying for that land for more than five years now. What Cincinnati does with the money from the sale is of little relevance to Blue Ash.

That hasn’t stopped COAST from doing its very best to link the deal to the streetcar. After all, when something is remotely related to the streetcar, it’s a sure bet COAST will be there, trying to “hold the line” against the project, which the organization sees as wasteful spending.

That’s where irony comes in. The organization is adamantly against any new spending and taxes. That is its basic purpose. But in this case, the organization is so blinded by its disapproval of the streetcar that it is actually opposing a deal that saves Cincinnati money. By freeing up $37.5 million in funds and closing down the airport, Cincinnati is stopping unnecessary spending and gaining a new, temporary revenue stream. That will let the city continue funding other projects without higher taxes or raising overall spending.

In other words, the deal is doing the exact kind of thing COAST promotes. But if there’s anything COAST is more determined to stop than extra spending and higher taxes, it’s the streetcar. 

Blue Ash City Council voted 6-1 Aug. 9 to redo the Blue Ash Airport deal. COAST has now vowed to lead a referendum on the rescinded deal for the 2013 ballot, even though Blue Ash councilmembers say the it falls under a section of the city charter that makes it immune to referendum. Chris Finney, legal counsel for COAST, says the rescinded deal is still a sale, so it can be brought up for referendum. 

If the referendum is placed on the ballot, it could delay the rescinded deal for 14 months. If voters approve the referendum, it would rescind the rescinded deal, and Blue Ash and Cincinnati will be forced to work with the 2006 deal.



CONTACT GERMAN LOPEZ: glopez@citybeat.com or @germanrlopez



 
 
 
 

 

 
08.22.2012 at 04:01 Reply

NOT everyone wins here. The thousands of tax-paying, middle-class pilots (who also funnel millions of dollars into the area) who use Blue Ash Airport every year do not win. Nor do the tax-payers who live in Cincinnati and who will have to use tax dollars to pay for what will inevitably be the white-elephant boondoggle will not win. 

It is sad that the city of Cincinnati has decided to waste its valuable resources on such a silly idea. What is sadder still is that so many people seem to willingly swallow the propaganda that somehow, a streetcar will pay for itself.

 

 
 
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