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Elizabeth Lloyd Mayer -- Science, Skepticism and the Inexplicable Powers of the Human Mind (Bantam)

By Chris Kemp · April 25th, 2007 · Lit
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  Elizabeth Lloyd Mayer -- Science, Skepticism and the Inexplicable Powers of the Human Mind
Elizabeth Lloyd Mayer -- Science, Skepticism and the Inexplicable Powers of the Human Mind



In 1991, Elizabeth Lloyd Mayer, Ph.D., was a prominent psychoanalyst and a professor at the University of California at Berkeley. Perhaps more importantly, she was a scientist.

And then her daughter's valuable, one-of-a-kind harp was stolen. For several months, she and her family searched for the harp: She contacted the local police; she posted advertisements and contacted harpist societies. The local television news networks even ran a story on the missing harp. On a trusted friend's suggestion, a desperate Mayer contacted a dowser in Arkansas. A few days later, the dowser called her back with the precise location of the harp. "It's in the second house on the right on D_____ Street, just off L_____ Avenue," he told her. And he was right. Finding the harp by such non-conventional means changed the way that Mayer looked at science. In her words: "This changes everything." Over the next 15 years, Mayer devoted much energy to finding a scientific explanation for the dowser's ability to find the harp, and for other examples of paranormal experience. The result is Extraordinary Knowing. Mayer interviews a neurosurgeon who admits he doesn't operate until he sees a white glow around the head of a patient and physicians who study the brains of nuns in states of deep meditation and clairvoyants who tell her intricate details about her life by phone from across the country. For a subject that unfailingly manages to split people into believers and nonbelievers, Mayer admits she is neither. She succeeds in keeping one foot planted firmly in each camp. For that alone, this book is a lesson in humility, grace and open-mindedness. (Chris Kemp) Grade: B ELIZABETH LLOYD MAYER -- SCIENCE, SKEPTICISM AND THE INEXPLICABLE POWERS OF THE HUMAN MIND

 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
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