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Alicia Reece and Rebecca Heimlich

By Kevin Osborne · February 1st, 2012 · Winners and Losers
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[WINNER] 

ALICIA REECE: The state representative from Bond Hill has introduced a bill that would reduce the number of reasons for making voters cast provisional ballots and also clarifies that election officials will be held responsible for errors instead of blaming voters. Reece pushed the bill after the 2010 race for Hamilton County Juvenile Court judge, in which ballots were disqualified after poll workers sent voters to the wrong tables. That race still remains unsettled, pending a lawsuit. (That reminds us: Hurry up and rule already, U.S. District Court Judge Susan Dlott.)

[LOSER]

REBECCA HEIMLICH: A former Clermont County assistant prosecutor, the conservative activist has taken an interesting — some would say awful — series of jobs after marrying Phil Heimlich, the ex-Cincinnati city councilman and Hamilton County commissioner.

First, Rebecca was Ohio director for Americans for Prosperity, the faux-grassroots group created by the Koch brothers that helped give rise to the Tea Party movement. Now Mrs. Heimlich works for the American Petroleum Institute and is trying to expand fracking in Ohio. Ugh. 

[WINNER]

FIREHOUSE SUBS: The chain of sandwich shops recently donated more than $19,000 in equipment to local fire departments. It includes a fire extinguisher training system, valued at more than $10,000, to the Blue Ash Fire Department and a smoke generator and training mannequin, valued at $8,900, to the Loveland-Symmes Fire Department. In all, the chain has donated more than $3.5 million to public safety entities in 275 communities across the nation since 2005. 

[LOSER]

RON MAAG: The state representative from Warren County has introduced a bill that, if approved, would repeal requirements that a person with a gun permit must notify police when they’re carrying a firearm while in a motor vehicle or walking down a street. Also, it removes a provision requiring the holder to keep his or her hands in “plain sight” after the officer approaches them. The Lebanon-area lawmaker says some officers have abused the law. We think this is a terrible idea that endangers law enforcement.

 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
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