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Art: Moving Images

By Matt Morris · June 29th, 2011 · CityBeat Recommends
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Newly opened at the Weston Art Gallery, the survey of 15 of Alison Crocetta's revelatory film and video works takes up the entire space for the entire summer (until Aug. 28), a rarity for the downtown gallery.

I can’t recall ever seeing an exhibition with so many films on view simultaneously; it’s comprised of more than two hours’ worth of footage, much more than I could hope to write about here. Crocetta has created a whole different realm, with its own sense of time, continuity and order. In nearly all of the works, one or more figures prompt some transformation of the surrounding space by initiating an act of art — sculpture, performance, drawing and sound.

Crocetta came to film by way of sculpture. She holds an undergraduate art degree from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University and an MFA with an emphasis in sculpture from Tyler School of Art at Temple University in Philadelphia. She currently is an assistant professor in the Department of Art at Ohio State University.

A trio of her films is on view in the street-level space, housed in a sculptural contraption that is like a miniature, private stage or the accordion-folded bellows on early models of cameras. Collectively titled "Clear/Fill/Reveal," all three look in upon the head and arms of a woman who is encased in a fabric enclosure similar to the one viewers peer into. She undergoes a series of rituals that augment the relationship between body and environment through the manipulation of objects. As an example, in "Reveal," she plucks stiff little flowers from her bathing cap so that they litter the floor around her, while she rhythmically considers, "She loves me/She loves me not."

Alison Crocetta's film and video exhibition continues through Aug. 28 at the Weston Art Gallery (650 Walnut St., Downtown). Go here to read Matt Morris' full review.

 
 
 
 

 

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