WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
Home · Articles · News · Winners and Losers · The Reds and City Council

The Reds and City Council

By Kevin Osborne · January 13th, 2010 · Winners and Losers

[WINNER]

CINCINNATI REDS: With the Bengals blowing their playoff game against the Jets, local sports fans thought they’d spend the long, cold months of winter grumbling over their Hudepohls. Instead, Reds management gave them something to be happy about with the signing of Aroldis Chapman to the roster.

The 21-year-old Cuban was star of the World Baseball Classic last spring for his mad pitching skills. Chapman’s $30.25 million, six-year contract is something of a gamble, but it’s a bet worth taking. The Reds’ Opening Day is less than three months away, so start getting your tickets now.

[LOSER]

CITY COUNCIL: We predicted the current Cincinnati City Council would be even more contentious than the last one, and members aren’t letting us down.

In office since Dec. 1, the current group hadn’t agreed as of Jan. 11 on a set of rules to conduct its various meetings, forcing the cancellation of a finance committee session this week. One set of proposed rules would allow the censuring of a council member if at least seven members agree that the person has impugned a colleague’s character or integrity. That’s not a good sign.

So far, this council and Mayor Mark Mallory have shown a lack of leadership. Happy 2010, voters!

[WINNER]

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI: UC’s College of Medicine recently won a $5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund extensive renovations to a laboratory. The money, which comes from President Obama’s economic stimulus package, will be used to overhaul the Kettering Laboratory research complex and is expected to add up to 12 new faculty research jobs and 30 construction-related jobs per year during the renovation.

To date, UC has received more than $35 million in grants for research programs from the stimulus package.

[LOSER]

THE ENQUIRER: When Cincinnati’s only daily newspaper published an article Jan. 7 about Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra music director Paavo Jarvi leaving his job in spring 2011, there was one glaring omission. Although the piece outlined Jarvi’s tenure here, it failed to mention the conductor’s DUI arrest last March when police found him asleep behind the wheel of a running car in Fairfax. Jarvi was sentenced to 180 days in jail, with all but three suspended.

If the article had been about any politician or pro sports player, that detail would’ve been mentioned. Why the double standard for arts figures? Could it be because of their well-heeled contributors and the clout they hold?

 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close