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Events: Herzog Historical Marker Reception

By Rick Bird · November 17th, 2009 · CityBeat Recommends
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“Lovesick Blues” became the most important song in Hank Williams’ career and one of the most influential singles in Country and Pop music history.

And it was recorded in downtown Cincinnati on Dec. 22, 1948, at E.T. Herzog Recording Company, on the second floor of 811 Race St. In all, the “father of contemporary Country music” would record eight songs at two sessions at the Herzog studio, including “My Bucket’s Got a Hole in It” and “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry.”

Yes, before Nashville had Music Row — and even before legendary King Records made its mark — Cincinnati had Herzog on Race.

A two-sided historical marker will be unveiled Sunday afternoon on Race Street in front of the building that housed Herzog, now home to CityBeat and ArtWorks.

The historical marker recognizing Herzog's studio and Hank Williams' sessions will be unveiled at 1 p.m.

in front of 811 Race St., Downtown. A reception will follow in the former studio space on the second floor.

Read Rick Bird's profile of Bucky Herzog and his influential recording studio here.

The Herzog recognition party carries over into the evening's Cincinnati Entertainment Awards for Music at the Madison Theater in Covington. Get all the CEA details here.

 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
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