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D. Lynn Meyers

Theaters, Actors, Etc.

By Rick Pender · June 21st, 2006 · Curtain Call
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  Multiple CEA winner D. Lynn Meyers has announced Ensemble Theater of Cincinnati's 2006-2007 season.
Matt Borgerding

Multiple CEA winner D. Lynn Meyers has announced Ensemble Theater of Cincinnati's 2006-2007 season.



The best surprises are worth waiting for, a fact proven annually by ENSEMBLE THEATRE OF CINCINNATI (ETC). Artistic Director D. LYNN MEYERS often brings up the rear in announcing her upcoming season -- but she does so with good reason. By waiting and being patient, Meyers lands new shows (ETC's stock in trade) that audiences love. The truth is that more than half of ETC's subscribers have already renewed for the 2006-2007 based on faith -- and Meyers' promise that if they don't like what she picks she'll refund their investment. I suspect none of them will be asking for their money back based on the half-dozen works Meyers is announcing this week, highlighted by a new partnership with a Los Angeles stage, The Falcon Theatre. Meyers' season opener will be a reinvented concert version of Jerry Herman's MACK & MABEL (Sept. 13-Oct. 1), a 1974 musical about silent film director Mack Sennett and comedienne Mabel Normand. Herman, of course, is the legendary composer of Hello, Dolly!, Mame and La Cage aux Folles. Meyers has picked one-time TV star Gary Sandy -- he played Andy Travis in WKRP in Cincinnati -- for the role of Mack (Sandy has appeared several times at ETC and the Cincinnati Playhouse over the years). The show will move to Los Angeles and to the Falcon, located in Burbank. The venue is a magnet for movie and TV performers, since it's the brainchild of producer/director Garry Marshall (who created Happy Days and Laverne and Shirley); Marshall's offspring are good company, too. His daughter Kathleen Marshall, a choreographer and director, just won a handful of Tonys for her revival of Pajama Game; son Rob Marshall, also a director and a choreographer -- and a Tony winner (for Cabaret) -- is best known for directing the Academy Award winning film of Chicago. ...

The balance of ETC's season is four regional premieres and a world premiere holiday musical, UGLY DUCK (Nov. 29-Dec. 31), from the team of playwright Joe McDonough and composer/lyricist David Kisor. The other shows Myers has announced: STRING OF PEARLS (Oct. 18-Nov. 5) by Michele Lowe, a play about the journey of one pearl necklace that connects the lives of 29 women. Lowe's darkly comic The Smell of the Kill was a popular show at the Cincinnati Playhouse in 2003. FICTION (Jan. 31-Feb. 18, 2007) by Stephen Dietz, a work about a pair of writers, married for 20 years, who learn secrets about each other when she makes a dying request to read his diaries.

The show premiered in 2003 (Dietz's Private Eyes was a big CEA winner for ETC in 2000, and the Cincinnati Playhouse is staging his play, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, next spring). OPUS (March 14-April 1, 2007) by Michael Hollinger, is a drama about a string quartet and its brilliant but unstable founder. The show had its premiere in an extended and much-praised run in Philadelphia earlier this year. SOUVENIR: A FANTASIA ON THE LIFE OF FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (April 25-May 13, 2007) by Stephen Temperley, had a Broadway run late in 2005 and its star, Judy Kaye, was a nominee for a 2006 Tony for her portrait of a notoriously tone-deaf but affecting singer. The charming memory play covers her "career," including her 1944 Carnegie Hall debut while in her seventies, a year before her death. (Kaye will reprise her performance this fall in Los Angeles, in case you need some reassurance that this is a piece that audiences will love.) Myers announced that the curtain times for Wednesday and Thursday evening performances will move up to 7:30 p.m. for the 2006-2007 season; Friday and Saturday evenings will remain at 8 p.m.; and Sunday matinees will still be at 2 p.m. Subscriptions to ETC ($154 for six shows) are available by calling the theater, 513-421-3555. ETC is located at 1127 Vine St. in Over-the-Rhine. Parking is readily available at the new Gateway Garage for $2.



contact rick Pender: rpender(at)
  Multiple CEA winner D. Lynn Meyers has announced Ensemble Theater of Cincinnati's 2006-2007 season.
Matt Borgerding

Multiple CEA winner D. Lynn Meyers has announced Ensemble Theater of Cincinnati's 2006-2007 season.



The best surprises are worth waiting for, a fact proven annually by ENSEMBLE THEATRE OF CINCINNATI (ETC). Artistic Director D. LYNN MEYERS often brings up the rear in announcing her upcoming season -- but she does so with good reason. By waiting and being patient, Meyers lands new shows (ETC's stock in trade) that audiences love. The truth is that more than half of ETC's subscribers have already renewed for the 2006-2007 based on faith -- and Meyers' promise that if they don't like what she picks she'll refund their investment. I suspect none of them will be asking for their money back based on the half-dozen works Meyers is announcing this week, highlighted by a new partnership with a Los Angeles stage, The Falcon Theatre. Meyers' season opener will be a reinvented concert version of Jerry Herman's MACK & MABEL (Sept. 13-Oct. 1), a 1974 musical about silent film director Mack Sennett and comedienne Mabel Normand. Herman, of course, is the legendary composer of Hello, Dolly!, Mame and La Cage aux Folles. Meyers has picked one-time TV star Gary Sandy -- he played Andy Travis in WKRP in Cincinnati -- for the role of Mack (Sandy has appeared several times at ETC and the Cincinnati Playhouse over the years). The show will move to Los Angeles and to the Falcon, located in Burbank. The venue is a magnet for movie and TV performers, since it's the brainchild of producer/director Garry Marshall (who created Happy Days and Laverne and Shirley); Marshall's offspring are good company, too. His daughter Kathleen Marshall, a choreographer and director, just won a handful of Tonys for her revival of Pajama Game; son Rob Marshall, also a director and a choreographer -- and a Tony winner (for Cabaret) -- is best known for directing the Academy Award winning film of Chicago. ...

The balance of ETC's season is four regional premieres and a world premiere holiday musical, UGLY DUCK (Nov. 29-Dec. 31), from the team of playwright Joe McDonough and composer/lyricist David Kisor. The other shows Myers has announced: STRING OF PEARLS (Oct. 18-Nov. 5) by Michele Lowe, a play about the journey of one pearl necklace that connects the lives of 29 women. Lowe's darkly comic The Smell of the Kill was a popular show at the Cincinnati Playhouse in 2003. FICTION (Jan. 31-Feb. 18, 2007) by Stephen Dietz, a work about a pair of writers, married for 20 years, who learn secrets about each other when she makes a dying request to read his diaries. The show premiered in 2003 (Dietz's Private Eyes was a big CEA winner for ETC in 2000, and the Cincinnati Playhouse is staging his play, Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, next spring). OPUS (March 14-April 1, 2007) by Michael Hollinger, is a drama about a string quartet and its brilliant but unstable founder. The show had its premiere in an extended and much-praised run in Philadelphia earlier this year. SOUVENIR: A FANTASIA ON THE LIFE OF FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (April 25-May 13, 2007) by Stephen Temperley, had a Broadway run late in 2005 and its star, Judy Kaye, was a nominee for a 2006 Tony for her portrait of a notoriously tone-deaf but affecting singer. The charming memory play covers her "career," including her 1944 Carnegie Hall debut while in her seventies, a year before her death. (Kaye will reprise her performance this fall in Los Angeles, in case you need some reassurance that this is a piece that audiences will love.) Myers announced that the curtain times for Wednesday and Thursday evening performances will move up to 7:30 p.m. for the 2006-2007 season; Friday and Saturday evenings will remain at 8 p.m.; and Sunday matinees will still be at 2 p.m. Subscriptions to ETC ($154 for six shows) are available by calling the theater, 513-421-3555. ETC is located at 1127 Vine St. in Over-the-Rhine. Parking is readily available at the new Gateway Garage for $2.



contact rick Pender: rpender(at)citybeat.com
 
 
 
 

 

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