WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
Home · Articles · Arts & Culture · Curtain Call · Cincinnati Shakespeare Company

Cincinnati Shakespeare Company

Theaters, Actors, Etc.

By Rick Pender · May 10th, 2006 · Curtain Call
0 Comments
     
Tags:
  Brian Isaac Phillips and the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company have earned a $25,000 grant from the NEA.
Matt Borgerding

Brian Isaac Phillips and the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company have earned a $25,000 grant from the NEA.



After 12 seasons, it's about time for folks from outside our region to notice the Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival, er, the CINCINNATI SHAKESPEARE COMPANY. (That's the name CSF -- sorry, old habits die hard -- has adopted to better reflect its status as a year-round presenter of classic plays with a "company" of professional actors.) That recognition comes in the form of a $25,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), which has selected Cincinnati Shakespeare as one of 36 theater companies to participate in the Shakespeare for a New Generation program, part of the NEA's Shakespeare in American Communities tour. The group will use the funding to take its touring productions of Hamlet and A Midsummer Night's Dream to area schools during 2006-2007, including 10 schools otherwise unable to afford such programs. As has been the company's practice for several seasons, these touring productions will be enacted by a cast of six young performers who are in training for careers in classical theater.

Other good things are happening at CSF (guess I need to start saying CSC, huh?), where Giles Davies is giving people the creeps in Richard III (see review, page 57): On Tuesday they'll open the first production in their recently announced STUDIO SERIES with Clifford Odets' Waiting for Lefty (presented on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in addition to May 17, 23 and 25). This year is the centennial of the left-wing playwright's birth; his Awake and Sing! is drawing audiences in New York City this spring. Lefty, which premiered in 1935, is a protest piece about taxi drivers fighting corrupt union officials in Depression-era Manhattan. It was a groundbreaking work that demonstrated how drama could be a medium for social commentary. CSC Artistic Director Brian Isaac Phillips praises the play's dialogue and poetry and adds, "Originally produced by a theater company that is a model for all that we hope to be, this play is the perfect production to introduce our Studio Series to Cincinnati."

After 12 seasons, it's about time for folks from outside our region to notice the Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival, er, the CINCINNATI SHAKESPEARE COMPANY. (That's the name CSF -- sorry, old habits die hard -- has adopted to better reflect its status as a year-round presenter of classic plays with a "company" of professional actors.) That recognition comes in the form of a $25,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), which has selected Cincinnati Shakespeare as one of 36 theater companies to participate in the Shakespeare for a New Generation program, part of the NEA's Shakespeare in American Communities tour. The group will use the funding to take its touring productions of Hamlet and A Midsummer Night's Dream to area schools during 2006-2007, including 10 schools otherwise unable to afford such programs. As has been the company's practice for several seasons, these touring productions will be enacted by a cast of six young performers who are in training for careers in classical theater. ...

Other good things are happening at CSF (guess I need to start saying CSC, huh?), where Giles Davies is giving people the creeps in Richard III (see review, page 57): On Tuesday they'll open the first production in their recently announced STUDIO SERIES with Clifford Odets' Waiting for Lefty (presented on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.

in addition to May 17, 23 and 25). This year is the centennial of the left-wing playwright's birth; his Awake and Sing! is drawing audiences in New York City this spring. Lefty, which premiered in 1935, is a protest piece about taxi drivers fighting corrupt union officials in Depression-era Manhattan. It was a groundbreaking work that demonstrated how drama could be a medium for social commentary. CSC Artistic Director Brian Isaac Phillips praises the play's dialogue and poetry and adds, "Originally produced by a theater company that is a model for all that we hope to be, this play is the perfect production to introduce our Studio Series to Cincinnati." Phillips and his colleagues will take this approach up again in January 2007 when they assemble an unusual collection of shows that will run in repertory for three weeks: Harold Pinter's The Dumbwaiter; a medieval morality play, Everyman; and Euripides' Greek tragedy, The Women of Troy. Info: 513-381-2273 or

  Brian Isaac Phillips and the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company have earned a $25,000 grant from the NEA.
Matt Borgerding

Brian Isaac Phillips and the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company have earned a $25,000 grant from the NEA.



After 12 seasons, it's about time for folks from outside our region to notice the Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival, er, the CINCINNATI SHAKESPEARE COMPANY. (That's the name CSF -- sorry, old habits die hard -- has adopted to better reflect its status as a year-round presenter of classic plays with a "company" of professional actors.) That recognition comes in the form of a $25,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), which has selected Cincinnati Shakespeare as one of 36 theater companies to participate in the Shakespeare for a New Generation program, part of the NEA's Shakespeare in American Communities tour. The group will use the funding to take its touring productions of Hamlet and A Midsummer Night's Dream to area schools during 2006-2007, including 10 schools otherwise unable to afford such programs. As has been the company's practice for several seasons, these touring productions will be enacted by a cast of six young performers who are in training for careers in classical theater.

Other good things are happening at CSF (guess I need to start saying CSC, huh?), where Giles Davies is giving people the creeps in Richard III (see review, page 57): On Tuesday they'll open the first production in their recently announced STUDIO SERIES with Clifford Odets' Waiting for Lefty (presented on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in addition to May 17, 23 and 25). This year is the centennial of the left-wing playwright's birth; his Awake and Sing! is drawing audiences in New York City this spring. Lefty, which premiered in 1935, is a protest piece about taxi drivers fighting corrupt union officials in Depression-era Manhattan. It was a groundbreaking work that demonstrated how drama could be a medium for social commentary. CSC Artistic Director Brian Isaac Phillips praises the play's dialogue and poetry and adds, "Originally produced by a theater company that is a model for all that we hope to be, this play is the perfect production to introduce our Studio Series to Cincinnati."

After 12 seasons, it's about time for folks from outside our region to notice the Cincinnati Shakespeare Festival, er, the CINCINNATI SHAKESPEARE COMPANY. (That's the name CSF -- sorry, old habits die hard -- has adopted to better reflect its status as a year-round presenter of classic plays with a "company" of professional actors.) That recognition comes in the form of a $25,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), which has selected Cincinnati Shakespeare as one of 36 theater companies to participate in the Shakespeare for a New Generation program, part of the NEA's Shakespeare in American Communities tour. The group will use the funding to take its touring productions of Hamlet and A Midsummer Night's Dream to area schools during 2006-2007, including 10 schools otherwise unable to afford such programs. As has been the company's practice for several seasons, these touring productions will be enacted by a cast of six young performers who are in training for careers in classical theater. ...

Other good things are happening at CSF (guess I need to start saying CSC, huh?), where Giles Davies is giving people the creeps in Richard III (see review, page 57): On Tuesday they'll open the first production in their recently announced STUDIO SERIES with Clifford Odets' Waiting for Lefty (presented on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in addition to May 17, 23 and 25). This year is the centennial of the left-wing playwright's birth; his Awake and Sing! is drawing audiences in New York City this spring. Lefty, which premiered in 1935, is a protest piece about taxi drivers fighting corrupt union officials in Depression-era Manhattan. It was a groundbreaking work that demonstrated how drama could be a medium for social commentary. CSC Artistic Director Brian Isaac Phillips praises the play's dialogue and poetry and adds, "Originally produced by a theater company that is a model for all that we hope to be, this play is the perfect production to introduce our Studio Series to Cincinnati." Phillips and his colleagues will take this approach up again in January 2007 when they assemble an unusual collection of shows that will run in repertory for three weeks: Harold Pinter's The Dumbwaiter; a medieval morality play, Everyman; and Euripides' Greek tragedy, The Women of Troy. Info: 513-381-2273 or www.cincyshakes.com. ...

You've probably heard of musicals by John Kander and Fred Ebb: Cabaret is a classic and Chicago has not only been a hit onstage but also an Academy Award-winning film. But I suspect you've never seen (or maybe even heard of) their first show, FLORA THE RED MENACE. You can catch it this weekend at UC's College-Conservatory of Music, where it's being staged Thursday-Saturday in the Cohen Family Studio Theater. It's not Clifford Odets, to be sure, but it is set in the Depression, the story of a young fashion designer who falls in love with a stuttering Communist despite the fact that the party's dogma is antithetical to her independent streak. Oh, by the way, in 1965 Flora starred a 19-year-old LIZA MINNELLI, who won a Tony Award in her Broadway debut. Admission to the CCM production is free, but ticket reservations are required: 513-556-4183. ...

For a very different woman, you might want to check out MY LETTER TO THE WORLD: THE LIFE & WORKS OF EMILY DICKINSON, a performance by the Know Theatre Tribe at the Aronoff Center's Weston Art Gallery Wednesday at 7 p.m. (repeated on May 17 at the same time). Dickinson was a profoundly private poet who published only seven of her 1,800 poems during her lifetime. Her writings explored an inner life and a sense of spirituality and simplicity that resonates with many people today. Performances are free and open to the public. Info: www.knowtheatre.com. ...

The 2006 CINCINNATI FRINGE FESTIVAL is coming, and CityBeat is readying the most extensive coverage in any Cincinnati media: Our May 31 issue will include previews of each show, and during the festival reviews will be posted regularly at citybeat.com .

 
 
 
 

 

comments powered by Disqus
 
Close
Close
Close